Feb 21, 2020  
Catalog/Bulletin 2015-2016 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2015-2016 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Anatomy

  
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    ANAT 100 - GROSS & DEVELOPMENTAL ANATOMY

    [233 Hours]
    This course consists of lectures and a laboratory where students dissect an entire embalmed cadaver. The objectives of this course are to provide the first year medical students the opportunity to learn the foundations of medicine and to introduce them to aspects of professionalism. The students learn the basic concepts of anatomy and the clinical applications of such concepts. Didactic lectures and the dissection of a cadaver are supplemented by clinical correlations and hands on excercises conduced by clinicians in different specialities. A radiologist from the community gives six lectures on imaging of the different areas of the body. A physician-surgeon who is a member of our teaching staff presents a weekly clinica survey of important clinical issues related to the area of dissection for the week. Each student has the opportunity to perform emergency procedures such as lumbar puncture, oral intubation, insertion of thoracostomy tubes and urethral catheterization in Cadaver Procedure Labs. A significant part of this course is designed to emphasize the clinical importance of the anatomy students are learning.
  
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    ANAT 110 - CELL BIOLOGY & MICROANATOMY

    [104 Hours]
    This course includes a study of cell biology and the histology of tissue types and organ systems. The first part of the course stresses cellular ultra structure, and function and the four basic tissue types. Laboratory exercises, using both computerized virtual slides and microscope slides, include the identification of cell types, cell organelles, and the basic tissues at the light and electron microscopic levels. The second part of the course deals with the histology and function of the organ systems. This part of the course is integrated with the topics being covered in Human Gross Anatomy and Prenatal Development as much as possible. The course is designed to provide basic information that will be utilized in preclinical and clinical programs throughout the medical curriculum.
  
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    ANAT 189 - HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY OF UPPER EXTREMITY, THORAX AND BACK

    [3 Credits]
    This course is centered around dissection of the upper extremity, thorax and back of the human body. Dissection is supplemented with films, cross-sections, models and clinical correlations of these specific areas. An accompanying lecture series is designed to orient, guide and stimulate the student toward independent effort.
  
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    ANAT 190 - HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY OF THE HEAD AND NECK

    [3 Credits]
    This course is centered around dissection of the head and neck of the human body. Dissection is supplemented with films, cross-sections, models, and clinical correlations of these specific areas. An accompanying lecture series is designed to orient, guide, and stimulate the student toward independent effort.
  
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    ANAT 191 - HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY OF ABDOMEN, PELVIS, PERINIUM AND LOWER EXTREMITY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is centered around dissection of the abdomen, pelvis, perineum and lower extremity of the human body. Dissection is supplemented with films, cross-sections, models, and clinical correlations of these specific areas. An accompanying lecture series is designed to orient, guide, and stimulate the student toward independent effort.
  
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    ANAT 192 - CELL BIOLOGY AND MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY

    [5 Credits]
    The initial portion of the course stresses organization of the cell, the biology of cellular organelles and the localization of important chemical constituents at the subcellular level. Additional presentation and discussion sessions throughout the course present the student with comprehensive information of the physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of cellular function. Histology lectures and laboratories emphasize the structural and functional relationships of human tissues.
  
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    ANAT 193 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    [1 Credit]
    This lecture/ laboratory course is taken concurrently with Anatomy 210 that provides the lecture portion. Current topics are fertilization, sectioned human embryos, human fetal dissections and fetal membranes, experimental embryology, reproductive toxicology and the culture of fetal/neonatal tissues. Literature reports and discussions may substitute for laboratory exercises.
  
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    ANAT 194 - RADIOGRAPHIC ANATOMY

    [1 Credit]
    0194 ANAT: RADIOGRAPHIC ANATOMY The fundamentals of radiology are presented in a series of lectures and demonstrations. Emphasis will be placed on the interpretation of normal radiographs from each body region. Presentations will be coordinated with the gross anatomy dissection schedule.
  
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    ANAT 195 - MEDICAL NEUROSCIENCE

    [6 Credits]
    An introduction to the structure and function of the nervous system, as well as its dysfunction. This course is emphasizes brain anatomy, including study of brain specimens in a laboratory setting; the physiology and synaptic transmission of nerve cells; the function and mechanisms underlying sensory and motor behavior; and higher cognitive functions. Clinical correlations, including lectures on major nervous system diseases, are provided by neurology and neurosurgery faculty. This course is also taken by first-year medical students.
  
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    ANAT 210 - DEVELOPMENTAL ANATOMY

    [3 Credits]
    The normal and abnormal aspects of human prenatal development are presented in a lecture series, which is coordinated, when possible, with the dissection schedule in gross anatomy. Definitive adult structures and their relations are appreciated through an understanding of their formation and relations during the embryonic period. Included are important features of fetal development, which are essential for normal birth and adaptation to the extrauterine environment.
  
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    ANAT 220 - ADVANCED SPECIAL DISSECTIONS

    [1-4 Credits]
    Hours to be arranged. Students perform detailed dissections of specific selected regions of the body.
  
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    ANAT 227 - CELL AND DEVELOPMENT BIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Lectures and group discussions will focus on selected topics involving cell and developmental biology. Topics may include gametes and their interactions, embryogenesis, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, differentiation, etc. A wide range of developmental systems will be considered.
  
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    ANAT 252 - DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROSCIENCE

    [3 Credits]
    This course will focus on recent advances in developmental neuroscience. Two hour formal lectures and a one hour seminar component per week will cover neural induction, neurogenesis, cell-ECM interactions, neural crest cell migration, neurotrophins, signal transduction, apoptosis axon guidance, axon-target interactions, synaptogenesis and activity-dependent refinement of neural connections. Students will be required to critically evaluate and present current literature on these subjects and write short essays.
  
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    ANAT 255 - ADVANCED HEAD AND NECK ANATOMY

    [4 Credits]
    One and one-half hours of lecture and two and one-half hours of laboratory. This course is designed as an advanced course in head and neck anatomy for post-graduate students in medicine, dentistry and the School of Graduate Studies. The course will include segments on the basic gross anatomy, neuro-anatomy and neuro-physiology of the head and neck. Special emphasis on functional considerations and clinical correlations will be given in the course.
  
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    ANAT 256 - MICROANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY OF THE ORAL CAVITY

    [2 Credits]
    This course includes a study of the development, microanatomy, and cell biology of structures associated with the oral cavity. The lectures will include basic and current information on the development and structure of all components of teeth (enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp), the supporting structures of teeth (periodontal ligament and alveolar bone), oral mucosa, and salivary glands. Current theories on tooth eruption will also be discussed. The laboratory will consist of demonstrations and self-study. Prerequisite: Anatomy 192.
  
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    ANAT 264 - SYNAPTIC ORGANIZATION OF THE BRAIN

    [3 Credits]
    This course will provide an in-depth examination of the physiologic and anatomic organization of the major structures of the brain and spinal cord. The course will consist of two 2-hour sessions per week, each week being devoted to a different CNS structure and taught by a different instructor with expertise in the field. The organization of each CNS structure, including the cellular physiology, major synaptic inputs, intrinsic synaptic organization, and primary outputs of the structure will be emphasized in the lectures. As part of their grade, students are required to give oral presentations summarizing recent primary research articles.
  
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    ANAT 270 - LABORATORY ROTATION

    [3 Credits]
    Students will work in one or more faculty laboratories to become acquainted with the various types of research conducted in the Department and with techniques used in these labs.
  
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    ANAT 280 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN CELL BIOLOGY AND ANATOMY

    [2-6 Credits]
    Lectures discussions, research, and/or laboratories will be arranged on areas not adequately covered in other scheduled courses. This course is designed to permit graduate students to explore one or more areas of particular interest in detail. Emphasis will be placed on those areas of special interest to faculty members of the Anatomy Department.
  
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    ANAT 285 - DIGITIAL MULTIMEDIA TECHNIQUES; VIDEO PRODUCTION, WEBSITE DESIGN, AND 3D ANIMATION

    [2-4 Credits]
    This course will provide instruction and practical experience in developing multimedia resources for medical education or research. The course will focus on educational videos, 3D-animations, and web-site development. The course is split into three modules which can be taken independently. For each module students will work on their own projects and present their results to the class for review and critique. Course limited to 5 students. Prerequisite: Pharm 250 or permission from the instructor.
  
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    ANAT 290 - SEMINAR

    [1 Credit]
    Students are required to attend and participate in oral presentations of research data and review of current topics of interest in Anatomy. A maximum of 4 credits toward the PhD degree may be earned. Students in the Anatomy Program are required to participate in Seminar each semester regardless of credit.
  
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    ANAT 300 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-6 Credits]
    Laboratory research conducted by PhD degree students conducting research prior to passing the Preliminary Exam.
  
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    ANAT 400 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Laboratory research conducted by Ph.D. degree students who have passed the Preliminary Exam and been admitted to candidacy. This research is typically part of the students’ Ph.D. dissertation.
  
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    ANAT 419 - ANATOMY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
  
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    ANAT 420 - ANATOMY CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    ANAT 420A–SURGICAL ANATOMY
  
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    ANAT 498 - ANATOMY RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    Legacy Course: ANAT 498A002 – RESEARCH
  
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    ANAT 999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Students may register for “Exam Only” when they have completed their Preliminary Exam and expect to complete PhD requirements and graduate within 3 semesters. Students are allowed to register for “Exam Only” for a maximum of 3 semesters.
  
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    ANAT 5407 - ADVANCED HEAD & NECK ANATOMY

    [3 Credits]
    Postgraduate Head and Neck Anatomy is a clinically-oriented course which deals with human anatomical structure, embryological development, function and dysfunction of the head and neck in its relationship to clinical practice. This course is designed as an advanced course in head and neck anatomy for post-graduate students in medicine, dentistry and the School of Graduate Studies. The course will include segments on the basic gross anatomy, developmental anatomy, cell biology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of the head and neck. Special emphasis on functional considerations and clinical correlations will be given in the course.
  
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    ANAT 6522 - HUMAN ANATOMY

    [5 Credits]
    A lecture and laboratory course which focuses on cell, tissue, organ and body system structures, and human cadaver dissection with emphasis on structure and function of neuromuscular and skeletal systems
  
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    ANAT 6533 - NEUROANATOMY

    [4 Credits]
    A study of anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems with emphasis on structures commonly involved in pathological conditions that impact function.

Anesthesiology

  
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    ANES 418 - ANESTHESIOLOGY SECONDARY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    This four week rotation provides senior medical students with the opportunity to be actively involved in the specialty of anesthesiology. Working in areas such as the preoperative clinics, operating rooms, post anesthetic care units and chronic pain clinics, will give the student exposure to the various roles of patient care that an Anesthesiologist provides. Objectives of this course will be; Assess and evaluate preoperative risk factors for anesthesia and surgery, basic airway management assessment, describe the principles of applied physiology and pharmacology in anesthesia, basic management of fluids and electrolytes in patients undergoing anesthesia. Students will be expected to attend lectures, conferences, read and review current literature. Completion of a written case report or review article will be expected at the end of the rotation.
  
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    ANES 420 - ANESTHESIOLOGY CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    This four week rotation provides senior medical students the opportunity to be actively involved in the operating room environment. Working in this unique area will give the student exposure to the specialty of anesthesiology. Objectives of this course will be; Assess and evaluate preoperative risk factors for anesthesia and surgery, Basic Airway Management assessment, describe the principles of applied physiology and pharmacology in anesthesia, basic management of fluids and electrolytes in patients undergoing anesthesia. Students will be expected to attend lectures, conferences, read and review current literature. Completion of a verbal case report or literature review will be expected at the end of the rotation.
  
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    ANES 498 - ANESTHESIOLOGY RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    This four week rotation provides senior medical students the opportunity to actively be involved in various research aspects of this specialty with the Chairman of the Department. The student will be exposed to the many facets of publication, introductions to writing grant proposals, and gaining approval from various institutional review boards. Lab research and /or clinical research projects may be conducted under direction from the Chairman. Upon completion of this rotation, the student will be expected to write a review article for publication.
  
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    ANES 499 - ANESTHESIOLOGY OUT-STATE ELEC

    [152 Hours]

Behavior and Community Health

  
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    BCHS 6212 - BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE THEORIES IN PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed to expose students to the origin and use of behavioral and psychosocial theories in public health research and practice. Specifically, this course will explore how theoretical concepts, constructs, frameworks and models are utilized in developing, implementing and evaluating public health interventions.
  
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    BCHS 6213 - COMMUNITY ANALYSIS, ECOLOGY AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to identify and understand how multiple social determinants of health contribute to health disparities at the community level. This course examines the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods to track health disparities and monitor progress of public health interventions designed to reduce or eliminate health disparities at the community level. Prerequisites: First year Core Courses.
  
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    BCHS 6214 - HEALTH COMMUNICATION

    [3 Credits]
    Providing a foundation in the science, theory, and practice of effective health communication, this course also prepares the student to develop, deliver, and evaluate health communication campaigns and disseminate information to a wide variety of potential audiences. Prerequisites: BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6215 - MONITORING AND EVALUATION

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the concepts of monitoring and evaluation of community, health promotion, and other public health programs. This course presents models, techniques, and practices of designing and implementing program evaluation plans. Prerequisite: EPID 6210.
  
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    BCHS 6216 - HEALTH PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides the student with a review of the basic principles and methods for planning, executing, monitoring, and evaluating health promotion and health education intervention programs Prerequisites: BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6219 - BEHAVIOR THEORY APPLICATIONS

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to expand the student’s knowledge of the analytic and research methods applied in the behavioral and health sciences. This course presents an overview of how these are used to inform the design, implementation, and evaluation of research and interventions within the context of of established behavioral theories and models. Prerequisites: BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6220 - ISSUES IN MATERNAL, CHILD AND ADOLESCENT HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    This course examines the history, organization, and financing of Maternal and Child Health (MCH) services in the U.S. and to provide an overview of the health, social, economic, and policy issues currently affecting reproductive age women, infants, children and adolescents. This course presents practices of assessing MCH related data and retrieving evidence-based interventions and translating data/evidence into policy remmendations. Prerequisites: BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6222 - CHRONIC DIESEASE PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    This course introduces the publich health student to current issues in chronic disease management, including challenges in disease prevention and management, the population-based perspective of chronic disease, integrating clinical preventive services into chronic care, and issues of public policy that impact the burden of chronic illness. Prerequisites: BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6223 - PUBLIC HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF AN AGING SOCIETY

    [3 Credits]
    This course prepares the public health student to address health promotion, chronic disease self-management and other behavioral and quality of life issues of health care and other behavioral and quality of life issues of health care for an aging society. Prerequisites: EPD 6210 and BCHS 6212.
  
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    BCHS 6224 - HEALTH RELATED PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    [3 Credits]
    This course introduces the student to the role physical activity and nutrition contribute to creating and maintaining optimum health.
  
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    BCHS 6227 - RESEARCH METHODS IN THE HEALTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical introduction to conducting research and preparing reports using quantitative methods in a structured environment. This course presents an overview of how theory is used to inform the design, implementation, and evaluation of research and interventions. Students will conduct guided research projects and secondary data analysis. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100.
  
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    BCHS 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student an opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific aspect of a public health discipline which is not the primary focus of existing public health courses. The course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credits hours toward the MPH Degree.
  
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    BCHS 6500 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course is designed, depending on the student’s interest and faculty availability, to cover topics of current areas of interest within the field. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic.
  
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    BCHS 6600 - CULMINATING EXPERIENCE IN BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    Students will synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in case studies that approximates an aspect of public health practice in behavioral and community health sciences. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100 or 6200; EPID 6210; ENHS 6238: BCHS 6212; HPSM 6268. By permission of instructor only.
  
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    BCHS 6700 - BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SEMINAR

    [1 Credit]
    This seminar will address a variety of topics related to behavioral and commmunity health. Each seminar will be taught by BCHS faculty and/or guest speaker.
  
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    BCHS 7201 - ECOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    This course introduces students to the concept that health-related outcomes involve the interaction of the individual with the environment at multiple levels. The ecological approach addresses how both individual-level risk factors, as well as beliefs, attitudes, and perceptions, may be moderated and/or mediated by environmental and social factors, such as norms, social networks, and cultural values, to affect health outcomes. Mirroring the complexity of contemporary public health problems, the major variables in social ecological models are multi-level and their influence is bi-directional. Students will learn to use this approach to address several major public health issues, including health disparity, smoking, obesity, and addiction. Class activities will include lecture, group projects, films, and discussion.
  
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    BCHS 7202 - HEALTH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

    [3 Credits]
    This is an advanced course on theoretical and practical aspects of health behavior change. The course is designed to provide an understanding of theoretical issues and current methodologies influencing health behavior change. Several models of health behavior change will be studied in detail. The strengths and shortcomings of these models for the development and evaluation of interventions at individual, community and system levels will be critically assessed. Students will be expected to translate their knowledge into practical interventions for health behavior change.
  
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    BCHS 7203 - ADVANCED RESEARCH METHODS IN COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral students, the purpose of this course is to provide students with a practical introduction to conducting research and preparing reports using quantitative methods in a structured environment. This course presents an overview of how theory is used to inform the design, implementation, and evaluation of research and interventions. Students will conduct guided research projects using secondary data analysis.
  
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    BCHS 7207 - ADVANCED COMMUNITY ANALYSIS, ECOLOGY, AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral degree students, this course is to identify how multiple social determinants of health contribute to health at the community level. This course examines the use of quantitative and qualitative research methods to evaluate health behaviors and monitor progress of public health interventions designed to promote health behaviors or eliminate health disparities at the community level.
  
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    BCHS 7217 - ADVANCED COMMUNITY BASED PARTICIPATORY PROGRAMMING

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral degree students, this course introduces the student to the concepts of community-based participatory research and interventional programming in public health. This course presents concepts, models, techniques, and practices useful in developing a collaborative program.
  
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    BCHS 7218 - ADVANCED PRINCIPLES OF RURAL HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral degree students, this course provides the student with an overview of healthcare and access issues involved in rural areas of the US.
  
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    BCHS 7221 - ADVANCED SURVEY DESIGN

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral degree students, this course provides the knowledge necessary to develop and execute a survey and analyze the collected data. Students will gain knowledge essential to design, create, and conduct a survey project. Utilizing knowledge gained from prerequisites, students will be able to analyze the survey data and determine its quality.
  
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    BCHS 7350 - TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH

    [3 Credits]
    This course will focus on multidisciplinary research skills needed to carry out bench to bedside community health and population translational research. The primary objective of the program is to train individuals to interpret basic and clinical science research and apply this knowledge to the development of community health and population research projects. Students will gain expertise in research study design, statistical methodology, translational research technologies, grant and scientific writing skills, evaluation and dissemination strategies.
  
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    BCHS 7351 - RACE/ETHNICITY GENDER AND HEALTH DISPARITIES

    [3 Credits]
    This course will explore the interconnection between race/ethnicity, gender and health by examining theoretical and research paradigms from sociology, anthropology, policy studies and public health. The course will explore how race/ethnicity and gender are shaped by political, social, economic, geographical and organizational factors and contribute to variations in health outcomes according to social class, geographical location, and social economic position. Class activities include: 1) class discussion with regard to how race/ethnicity and gender translate into unequal distribution of power that simultaneously operate at both the macro (societal) and micro (individual) levels of society; 2) data collection approaches and analytical methods to identify and understand links between race/ethnicity, gender and health; and 3) discussions concerning the role of public health in identifying ways to utilize emerging research regarding race/ethnicity, gender and health to advance public health research and practice.
  
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    BCHS 7352 - MENTAL HEALTH PROMOTION IN COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCE

    [3 Credits]
    This course exposes students to the emerging field of mental health promotion; its history, principles, theories;and its differences and linkages to mental illness prevention. The course objectives are to impart knowledge of the basic principles of mental health promotion; teach the many factors causal to mental illness and the maintenance of mental health; and afford students an understanding of the complexity and multiplicity of disciplines involved in the practice of mental health promotion. In this course, students will review trends (vital statistics and epidemiology) in mental health among different populations as well as the risk and protective factors associated with mental health. Students will explore the sociocultural definitions and impact of mental health, mental illness, and stigma. The course describes a conceptual paradigm for mental health promotion from both policy and practice frameworks, including assessment, consultation, education, and training.
  
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    BCHS 7353 - FUNDAMENTALS OF MULTI-LEVEL DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will familiarize students with the conceptual basis for the design, conduct, and analysis of multilevel studies. Students will integrate and apply concepts learned in previous Biostatistics and methods courses as they relate to multilevel studies. Using a combination of lectures/seminars, and discussions, the student will develop a basic understanding of how key social factors shape the distribution of health and disease in the general population. The course will be taught as a seminar and will be heavily literature-based. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, as well as lead the presentation of certain topics. Students will be expected to perform guided analyses of provided data-sets, with the emphasis on interpretation of results. Students are expected to be familiar enough with SAS to run provided analysis programs. Prerequisites BIOS 6100, BIOS 6102 or equivalent
  
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    BCHS 7400 - INDEPENDENT STUDIES FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH DOCTORAL STUDENTS

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course provides a doctoral student the opportunity to study an advanced topic under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific substantive topic in community health sciences. This course will involve direct readings or hands-on research and may involve completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studied. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic. Students may register for more than one specific Independent Studies course in a semester.
  
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    BCHS 7410 - CHS TEACHING PRACTICUM

    [2 Credits]
    This course will provide Doctoral students in Community Health Science with supervised teaching experience to develop their pedagogical skills. This experience will come primarily from serving in the role of teaching assistants for Behavioral and Community Health Sciences courses. Developmental workshops and materials offered by the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship will be incorporated as part of the training experience.
  
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    BCHS 7500 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course is designed to address advanced topics in behavioral and community health sciences at the doctoral level beyond what is currently addressed in existing courses and topics of current and special interest.
  
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    BCHS 7700 - COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCE SEMINAR I

    [1 Credit]
    This course provides students with a broad overview of issues in behavioral and community health sciences. Each session will address a different topic related to research and practice and will be taught by both CHS faculty and visiting professors.
  
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    BCHS 7701 - COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES SEMINAR II

    [1 Credit]
    (P/F) This course provides students with a broad overview of issues in behavioral and community health sciences. Each session will address a different topic related to research and practice and will be taught by both CHS faculty and visiting professors.
  
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    BCHS 7702 - COMMUNITY HEALTH SCIENCES SEMINAR III

    [1 Credit]
    (P/F) This course provides students with a broad overview of issues in behavioral and community health sciences. Each session will address a different topic related to research and practice and will be taught by both BCHS faculty and visiting professors
  
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    BCHS 7900 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    (P/F) For doctoral candidates conducting research for their dissertation. Registration by permission of the program. Amount of credit must be stated at the time of registration.

Biochemistry

  
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    BIOCH 100 - BIOCHEMISTRY

    [80 Hours]
    This course provides the foundation for the study of normal and diseased states at the molecular level. The following topics are included in the course of study: macromolecular structure and function; enzymology and enzyme kinetics; intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids; the metabolic basis of disease; nutrition, vitamins, and obesity; endocrine biochemistry; molecular biology (including DNA, RNA, protein synthesis, molecular diagnostics, and the molecular basis of cancer); and the foundations of medical genetics (including chromosome structure and function, chromosomal disorders, inheritance patterns, the genetic basis of metabolic disorders and cancer, and population genetics). Particular emphasis is placed upon the medical relevance of biochemical concepts, and the biochemical defects that result in human disease. Modern, up-to-date developments are used to build upon classical concepts in order to provide students with the background necessary to be excellent physicians who are well-equipped to diagnose and treat patients. The course consists of lectures and review sessions.
  
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    BIOCH 207 - INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL METHODS OF RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Theoretical discussions and laboratory work during the first year of laboratory rotations, as well as research related work for graduate students prior to passing the Qualifying Examination. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    BIOCH 208 - CELL CULTURE TECHNIQUES

    [1 Credit]
    A course in contemporary cell culture techniques. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    BIOCH 221 - PROTEIN CHEMISTRY

    [2 Credits]
    Didactic and discussion sessions covering advanced aspects of protein structure-function; thermodynamics of protein folding; protein evolution; bioinformatics analysis of protein superfamilies; techniques of protein expression; purification and characterization of natural and recombinant proteins. Prerequisite: INTER 111.
  
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    BIOCH 223 - PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    [3 Credits]
    Didactic and discussion sessions covering the thermodynamic and biophysical properties of biochemically relevant macromolecules and their intramolecular interactions. Prerequisite: INTER 111 and one semester of calculus. Two semesters of physical chemistry is highly recommended, otherwise, permission of the course director is required.
  
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    BIOCH 260 - CANCER MOLECULAR GENETICS AND APPLICATIONS

    [3 Credits]
    This upper level course examines the types of genetic alterations that contribute to cancer development and discusses some of the underlying biochemical principals that result from these genetic alterations. By the end of the course, students should understand that various genotoxic stresses and subsequent genetic alterations can induce cancer development as well as promote in tumor progression. Further, students should be familiar with different approaches to identify candidate genes for cancer development and tumor progression. The class will involve two, two-hour lectures per week. It is offered jointly with the Dept of Genetics as GENET 245. Prerequisite: INTER 111 and 121, 122, 123 and 124.
  
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    BIOCH 280 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY

    [1-4 Credits]
    One to four hours of lecture and discussion per week. The topics will be arranged by consultation with faculty members expert in the areas. The topics will add breadth and depth to the fundamentals taught in other courses and will be chosen on the basis of their timeliness and student and faculty interest. Biochemistry of the cell cycle, comparative biochemistry, enzymology, intermediary metabolism, vitamins and nutrition, mass spectrometry, and bioenergetics are representative topics. A given topic will recur on a cycle of two to three years. The student’s transcript will indicate, in addition to the course title, the particular topic covered during the given semester. This procedure will serve to clarify the repeat appearance of Biochemistry 280 and 281 on the student’s transcript.
  
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    BIOCH 298 - SEMINAR

    [1 Credit]
    Reports on research progress and on current literature. Six credits of seminar (either BIOCH 298 or BIOCH 299) are required for departmental program of study, but note that the School of Graduate Studies permits only four credits of seminar to be applied toward graduation.
  
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    BIOCH 299 - PROFESSIONAL SKILLS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

    [1 Credit]
    Didactic and discussion sessions covering different ‘soft’ skills required for success in academic and industr career tracks. Topics can range from manuscript writing and submission procedures, grant writing, interview skills, methods of negotiation, pedagogical metrics, and resume development. The Department requires that all students enroll for the course, unless they are enrolled in BIOCH 999 (exam only). Six credits of seminar (either BIOCH 298 or BIOCH 299) are required for departmental program of study, but note that the School of Graduate Studies permits only four credits of seminar to be applied toward graduation.
  
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    BIOCH 300 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Full-time research efforts toward the thesis for PhD degree students, after successful completion of the Qualifying Exam and prior to passing the Preliminary Exam. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
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    BIOCH 400 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Full-time research efforts toward the thesis for PhD degree students after successful completion of the Preliminary Exam. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
  
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    BIOCH 999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Legacy Course: Students may register for “Exam Only” when they have completed their Preliminary Exam and expect to complete PhD requirements and graduate within 3 semesters. Students are allowed to register for “Exam Only” for a maximum of 3 semesters.

Biology

  
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    BIOL 1001 - GENERAL BIOLOGY LAB

    [1 Credit]
  
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    BIOL 1101 - GENERAL BIOLOGY II LAB

    [1 Credit]

Biostatistics

  
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    BIOS 3115 - BASIC STATISTICS

    [3 Credits]
    A study of scientific methodology and the use of statistics in design and analysis of studies in the health sciences. Consideration is given to fundamentals of sample selection, measures of central tendency, measures of variation, correlation coefficients, and tests of hypotheses. 3 hours lecture. Prerequisite: college algebra.
  
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    BIOS 6100 - BIOSTATISTICAL METHODS I

    [4 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. General introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: techniques and principles for summarizing data, estimation, hypothesis testing and decision-making. Students are instructed on the proper use of statistical software to manage, manipulate, and analyze data and to prepare summary reports and graphical displays. Examples and problems from the health sciences are used throughout. Laboratory sessions will be held in the SoPH computing lab and are designed to closely follow the lecture material. {Non-biostatistics majors only.}
  
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    BIOS 6102 - BIOSTATISTICAL METHODS II

    [4 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture and two hours of lab per week. General introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics: techniques and principles of summarizing data, estimation, hypothesis testing and decision-making. Students are instructed on the proper use of statistical software to manage, manipulate, and analyze data to prepare summary reports and graphical displays. Examples and problems from the health sciences are used throughout. Laboratory sessions will be conducted in the SoPH computing lab and will provide hands-on instruction to students on the proper use of statistical software to analyze data arising from linear and logistic regression models and multi-way ANOVA models. [Non-Biostatistics majors only].
  
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    BIOS 6200 - PRINCIPLES OF APPLIED STATISTICS

    [4 Credits]
    Three hours lecture and two hours of lab per week. Broad coverage of methods of applied statistics, designed for students who want to take advantage of their good math backgrounds for better understanding. Data description; elementary probability, random variables, distributions; principles of statistical inference; methods for one-two-, and multi-sample settings, including ANOVA and multiple regression; methods for categorical responses. Use of SAS and other software for analysis, simulations, graphics, and report writing. Some cases will use large national databases, such as NHANES and CPS. Laboratory sessions will be held in the SoPH computing lab and are designed to closely follow the lecture material. Prerequisites: multi-variable calculus and linear algebra.
  
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    BIOS 6202 - APPLIED LINEAR MODELS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This is a practical course on the use of general linear models. Topics include a review of relevant matrix algebra; general linear models including multiple regression, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, multivariate response, and logistic regression models; methods for estimation, hypothesis testing and diagnostics; model specification for designed experiments and for observational studies; applications are in the health sciences. Prerequisites: BIOS 6100 or BIOS 6200.
  
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    BIOS 6204 - STATISTICAL THEORY I

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Elementary concepts of probability; conditional probability, Bayes’ theorem; random variables and probability distributions, transformations of random variables; moments and moment generating functions; discrete and continuous random variables, common families of distributions; essential inequalities and identities; multivariate distributions, joint, conditional and marginal distributions; covariance and correlation, conditional expectation; basic concepts of random samples; convergence concepts, convergence in probability and in distribution, the law of large numbers, and the central limit theorem. Prerequisites: multivariable calculus and linear algebra.
  
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    BIOS 6206 - STATISTICAL THEORY II

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of data reduction, sufficiency and completeness, minimal sufficient statistics; the likelihood principle; point estimation, method of moments, maximum likelihood estimation; method of evaluating estimators, unbiased estimation, Fisher information, hypotheses testing, likelihood ratio tests, methods of evaluating interval estimators. Prerequisite: BIOS 6204.
  
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    BIOS 6210 - CATEGORICAL DATA ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Model formulation, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing for categorical data from different types of experimental and survey research situations: Characterization of interaction in multidimensional contingency tables, stepwise regression procedures for proportions, and exact inference. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102 or BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6212 - SURVIVAL ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This course provides students with statistical methodology for the analysis of time-to-event data and trains students in the appropriate analysis of survival data, by both parametric and nonparametric methods. Emphasis will be placed on methods and models most useful in clinical research with attention to proper interpretation of statistical packages output. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102, BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6300 - STATISTICAL COMPUTING

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. An introductory programming course oriented toward statistical applications using SAS (including IML) and R programming languages. Topics include data types, assignment statements, operators, sequential control, conditional control, iteration, subprograms, arrays, character manipulation, manipulating and processing SAS output from SAS procedures, Gibbs sampler, and Markov Chain Monte-Carlo methods. Prerequisites: BIOS 6202 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 6302 - LONGITUDINAL DATA ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This course will emphasize analysis and interpretation of data obtained from subjects measured repeatedly over time. Coverage will begin with traditional approaches to analysis of longitudinal data such as multivariate repeated measures and the univariate analysis of repeated measures as s split-plot model and will quickly lead into models for mean response such as the analysis of response profiles and parametric curve fitting including linear splines. Models for the covariance matrix will be then be considered. Linear mixed models and generalized estimation equations will be covered in detail. Other topics will be covered as time allows. Examples from the health and biomedical sciences will be presented to motivate the material. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102 OR BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6304 - DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EXPERIMENTS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Principles of experimentation. Completely randomized designs, randomized complete block designs, factorial designs, Latin squares, crossover designs, blocking, and response surface designs. Applications to the health sciences. Prerequisites: BIOS 6100 or BIOS 6200 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 6308 - MULTIVARIATE METHODS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Review of matrix algebra, multivariate normal distribution, multivariate general linear model, principal components, factor analysis, cluster analysis, discriminant analysis. Applications to the health sciences. Prerequisites: BIOS 6202, BIOS 6206.
  
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    BIOS 6310 - APPLIED BAYESIAN METHODS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to Bayesian approach to statistical inference. Application oriented, but such theory will be covered as necessary for proper understanding of Bayesian methodology. Topics covered include Bayesian Inference - prior determination, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, prediction, model assessment and model choice; Bayesian Computation - Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. Gibbs Sampling and extensions; and Bayesian applications on real data sets from the biological or medical fields. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102 (or BIOS 6202), BIOS 6206, BIOS 6300, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 6312 - SAMPLING METHODS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Methods for conducting sample surveys in the health sciences: Biases and non-sampling errors, probability and non-probability samples, simple random sampling, stratification, varying probabilities of selection, multi-stage sampling, systematic sampling, cluster sampling, double sampling, and ratio estimation. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 6314 - CLINICAL TRIALS METHODOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the conduct of clinical trials and clinical trials methodology. Topics covered include selection of primary and secondary research questions and hypotheses, use of surrogate variables, defining study population, generalizability of results, basic study design, randomization process, blinding, sample size estimation, using baseline assessments, recruitment of study participants, data collection and quality control, assessing and reporting adverse events, assessing quality of life, participant adherence, survival analysis techniques and issues, monitoring response variables, data analysis issues, study closeout, and reporting and interpreting results. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102 or BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6316 - STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Markov chains; birth-death processes; random walks; renewal theory; Poisson processes; Brownian motion; branching processes; martingales; with applications. Prerequisites: BIOS 6206.
  
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    BIOS 6318 - NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. The course will cover methods based on ranks for one, two and k sample inferences, including Sign Test, Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test, Kruskai-Wallis Test, Tests for Trends and Association and Multivriate Tests, Analysis of Censored Data, Bootstrap methods, Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods when compared to the parametric counterpart will be discussed.
  
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    BIOS 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student an opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific area within biostatistics which is not the primary focus of an existing biostatistics course. The course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours toward the MPH Degree.
  
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    BIOS 6450 - DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EXPRESSION STUDIES

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to DNA, RNA, protein and gene expression; statistical methods; microarray technology; data visualization and quality control; variability in microarray data; specific and non-specific hybridization– background correction; normalization and transformation; gene expression summarization; missing value problems; detection of differentially expressed genes; design of microarray experiments. Prerequisite: BIOS 6202.
 

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