Mar 21, 2019  
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Biostatistics

  
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    BIOS 6314 - CLINICAL TRIALS METHODOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to the conduct of clinical trials and clinical trials methodology. Topics covered include selection of primary and secondary research questions and hypotheses, use of surrogate variables, defining study population, generalizability of results, basic study design, randomization process, blinding, sample size estimation, using baseline assessments, recruitment of study participants, data collection and quality control, assessing and reporting adverse events, assessing quality of life, participant adherence, survival analysis techniques and issues, monitoring response variables, data analysis issues, study closeout, and reporting and interpreting results. Prerequisites: BIOS 6102 or BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6316 - STOCHASTIC PROCESSES

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Markov chains; birth-death processes; random walks; renewal theory; Poisson processes; Brownian motion; branching processes; martingales; with applications. Prerequisites: BIOS 6206.
  
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    BIOS 6318 - NONPARAMETRIC STATISTICS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. The course will cover methods based on ranks for one, two and k sample inferences, including Sign Test, Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test, Kruskai-Wallis Test, Tests for Trends and Association and Multivriate Tests, Analysis of Censored Data, Bootstrap methods, Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these methods when compared to the parametric counterpart will be discussed.
  
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    BIOS 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student an opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific area within biostatistics which is not the primary focus of an existing biostatistics course. The course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours toward the MPH Degree.
  
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    BIOS 6450 - DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF EXPRESSION STUDIES

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Introduction to DNA, RNA, protein and gene expression; statistical methods; microarray technology; data visualization and quality control; variability in microarray data; specific and non-specific hybridization– background correction; normalization and transformation; gene expression summarization; missing value problems; detection of differentially expressed genes; design of microarray experiments. Prerequisite: BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6500 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOSTATISTICS

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course is designed depending on student’s interest and faculty availability, to cover advanced topics such as time series analysis, machine learning, bioinformatics, robust statistics, etc. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic.
  
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    BIOS 6600 - CULMINATING EXPERIENCE IN BIOSTATISTICS

    [3 Credits]
    Students will synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in case studies that approximates an aspect of public health practice in behavioral and community health sciences. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100 or 6200; EPID 6210; ENHS 6238: BCHS 6212; HPSM 6268. By permission of instructor only.
  
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    BIOS 6610 - BIOSTATISTICAL CONSULTING I

    [2 Credits]
    A course designed to expose students to realistic facets of Biostatistical consulting practice. The course draws on cumulated knowledge on the Biostatistics curriculum for use on actual applications in public health and biomedical sciences. Foundations of Biostatistical Consulting Practice will be discussed. Data analysis/reporting and grant proposal development using techniques up to BIOS 6202 will be practiced. Applications in public health and biomedical basic research will be covered. This course is intended for Biostatistics majors after the first year of master’s level coursework. Prerequisite: BIOS 6202.
  
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    BIOS 6611 - BIOSTATISTICAL CONSULTING II

    [2 Credits]
    A course designed to expose students to realistic facets of biostatistical consulting practice. The course draws on cumulated knowledge on the biostatistics curriculum for use on actual applications in public health and biomedical sciences. Data analysis/reporting and grant proposal development using technique beyond BIOS 6202 will be illustrated. Applications in public health, clinical trials, and OMICS will be covered. This course is intended for biostatistics majors after the first year of master’s level coursework. Prerequisite: BIOS 6610
  
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    BIOS 6700 - RESEARCH SEMINAR IN BIOSTATISTICS

    [1 Credit]
    Reports on research progress in current literature. Students attend colloquium and give an oral presentation in their second year.
  
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    BIOS 6900 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Registration by permission of the program. Amount of credit must be stated at time of registration.
  
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    BIOS 7200 - THEORY OF LINEAR MODELS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This course presents the essentials of statistical inference theory for general linear models. Topics include a review of relevant matrix algebra, distributions of quadratic forms, theoretical aspects of estimation, hypothesis testing and diagnostics. Prerequisites: BIOS 6202, BIOS 6206 or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 7201 - MULTIVARIATE STATISTICS

    [3 Credits]
    Introduces a variety of topics in both univariate and multivariate statistics including ANOVA, MANOVA, repeated measures, logistic regression, maninging missing data, parametic and nonparametic statistics for multivariate designs.
  
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    BIOS 7202 - GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Study of parametric models in the exponential family of distributions including the normal, binomial, Poisson, and gamma. Parameter estimation with Iterative re-weighted least squares and quasi-likelihood methods. Modeling of correlated data or data with non-constant variance via mixed models (e.g., GLIMMIX). In-depth coverage of generalized estimating equations (GEE1 and GEE2) and quadratic estimating equations (QEE). Applications with be presented from a variety of settings such as the basic sciences, medicine, dental, and public health. Prerequisites: BIOS 6202, BIOS 6206, or permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIOS 7204 - ADVANCED STATISTICAL THEORY I

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. A mathematical study of the classical theory of statistical inference. Moment generating functions and character functions, distributions of order statistics, exponential family of distributions, models of convergence, the Cramer-Rao inequality, efficiency, best unbiased estimation, completeness, minimal sufficiency, maximum likelihood estimators, monotone likelihood ratio, unbiased and invariant hypothesis test, generalized likelihood ratio tests, Bayes’ and minimax procedures. Prerequisite: BIOS 6206.
  
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    BIOS 7205 - ADVANCED STATISTICAL THEORY II

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. A mathematically rigorous survey of selected topics in the theory of statistical inference such as: Bayesian inference, decision theory, information theory, large sample theory, multivariable distributions, nonparametric inference, sequential analysis, stochastic processes, time series, components of variance. Prerequisite: BIOS 7204.
  
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    BIOS 7212 - MODEL DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    [3 Credits]
    Includes the topics: ANCOVA, exploratory factor analysis, estimation of factorial model, rotation of actors, confirmatory analysis, goodness of fit testing, multidimensional scaling; discriminate analysis, cluster analysis, theoretical development and testing, path analysis; structural equation modelling.
  
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    BIOS 7302 - MIXED MODELS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. Rigorous course on the theory of mixed models. Essentials of relevant matrix algebra; distribution of quadratic forms; models with variance-covariance components; one-way, two-way random and mixed models with fixed effects; methods of estimation of variance components; ML, REML, ANOVA; estimation of fixed effects; testing hypotheses about fixed effects; repeated measures design methods; choices of covariance structures; generalized linear mixed models. Prerequisite: BIOS 7200.
  
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    BIOS 7318 - STATISTICAL LEARNING

    [3 Credits]
    Statistical learning or machine learning methodology explores various ways of estimating functional dependencies between a response variable (e.g., a disease outcome) and a large set of explanatory variables (e.g., gene expression data). This course will provide an overview of supervised learning methods used in bioinformatics and high-dimensional data research. The topics include regularization in linear models, tree and related methods, support vector machines, and boosting. Practical uses of these algorithms will be illustrated in biological research.
  
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    BIOS 7320 - ROBUST INFERENCE

    [3 Credits]
    3 hours of lecture per week. This course will provide a general introduction to robust statistical inference. The aim is to provide specific techinques for handling outliers and small deviations from model assumptions in linear models, generalized linear models, and survey sampling. Prerequisites: BIOS 7200, 7202 (or BIOS 6210), and BIOS 7204
  
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    BIOS 7410 - TEACHING PRACTICUM IN BIOSTATISTICS

    [1 Credit]
    Advanced PhD students in Biostatistics working under the supervision of a faculty member will have the opportunity to gain valuable in-class teaching experience. Students will be intensively involved in all aspects of course teaching and administration. Working closely with a faculty member, the student will prepare a syllabus, lectures, handouts, quizzes, and exams. The student will also be responsible for all grading of homework, quizzes and exams. The faculty member will evaluate each of the lectures, providing direction, advice and feedback to the student. A written evaluation detailing the student’s performance will be provided as feedback to the student and will be the basis for the (Pass/Fail) grade. Each PhD student in Biostatistics is required to successfully complete at least 3 hours of supervised teaching before graduation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of the qualifying exam at the PhD level.
  
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    BIOS 7900 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Registration by permission of the program. Amount of credit must be stated at time of registration.
  
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    BIOS 9999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]

Cardiopulmonary Technology

  
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    CPSC 3100 - INTRODUCTION TO THE CLINICAL CARDIOPULMONARY SCIENCES

    [1 Credit]
    Lecture course designed to introduce students to various aspects of respiratory therapy and cardiovascular technology. Course content includes a review of medical terminology along with discussions related to ethical and legal issues encountered in the allied health sciences.
  
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    CPSC 3130 - CARDIOPULMONARY HUMAN GROSS ANATOMY

    [5 Credits]
    Lectures on cell, tissue, organ, and body systems, structures, and dissection of human cadaver with emphasis on structure and function of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems.
  
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    CPSC 3200 - RESPIRATORY THERAPY FUNDAMENTALS

    [4 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course covering general principles of respiratory therapy modalities and techniques.
  
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    CPSC 3210 - CARDIOPULMONARY PHARMACOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    A study of the medications and drugs that affect cardiopulmonary function and the therapeutic agents used by pulmonary and cardiovascular health care professionals. Review of pathogenic and nonpathogenic microorganisms found in the respiratory system and which may contaminate respiratory therapy and diagnostic equipment.
  
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    CPSC 3220 - CARDIOPULMONARY PHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course presents a detailed analysis of cardiopulmonary physiology. The emphasis is placed on structure and function and whenever possible clinical applications will be introduced to enhance an understanding of the normal cardiopulmonary system.
  
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    CPSC 3270 - PATIENT ASSESSMENT

    [3 Credits]
    A lecture laboratory course designed to teach basic patient assessment skills in a disease state management model. Students will refine interpersonal communication skills and develop a comprehensive, well organized approach for assessing patients in any clinical setting. Credit hours reduced from 4 to 3.
  
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    CPSC 3280 - CARDIOPULMONARY PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed to introduce the student to common pulmonary and cardiovascular disease processes and how these disease affect respiratory and cardiovascular function. Emphasis is placed on pathogenesis, history and physical findings, diagnostic findings, and clinical management of each disease entity. Students will be able to differently diagnose diseases covered in lecture.
  
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    CPSC 3282 - CLINICAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY I

    [4 Credits]
    A lecture/laboratory course designed to introduce the student to two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, and their application in the diagnosis of systolic and diastolic cardiac dysfunction and valvular heart disease.
  
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    CPSC 3285 - RESPIRATORY CLINICS I

    [3 Credits]
    This course is the first of four clinical courses during which students develop the clinical skills necessary to become a competent respiratory care professional. In this course, students will gain competence in the respiratory care of adult patients receiving non-intensive care. Emphasis is placed on routine patient care, including such modalities as oxygen therapy, use of aerosol humidity devices, aerosol delivery of medication, airway clearance techniques, and hyperinflation therapy.
  
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    CPSC 3290 - PRINCIPLES OF CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    A lecture and laboratory course covering the fundamentals of 12-lead electrocardiography, Holter monitor recordings, and stress testing protocols. Each student should be able to perform basic interpretation of these tests, and understand the electrophysiologic basis for these findings
  
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    CPSC 3295 - SONOGRAPHY PRINCIPLES AND INSTRUMENTATION

    [2 Credits]
    This course will provide the student with an understanding of the principles of ultrasound physics and instrumentation involved in two-dimensional, M-mode and Doppler echocardiography. In addition, topics pertinent to the student’s professional development will be covered, such as patient communication, sonographer safety, professionalism, and more.
  
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    CPSC 3300 - NEONATOLOGY & PEDIATRICS

    [4 Credits]
    Lecture series designed to cover the development of the cardiopulmonary system from embryo to puberty. Emphasis includes problems of the infant and newborn that affect cardiopulmonary function and techniques for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.
  
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    CPSC 3360 - MEDICAL ETHICS

    [1 Credit]
    A discussion of current ethical issues facing health care providers, as well as landmark cases that have shaped resulting policy.
  
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    CPSC 3362 - CRITICAL CARE CONCEPTS I

    [3 Credits]
    This class is designed to introduce the student to the physics and mechanics of artificial ventilation as well as the theory and practical application of manual resuscitators and mechanical ventilators.
  
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    CPSC 3370 - ADVANCED PULMONARY PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    [1 Credit]
    This course is designed to examine the clinical assessment, physical and diagnostic findings, and current management strategies for advanced pulmonary conditions encountered by the respiratory care practitioner within critical care settings and among special populations, as well as discussion on emerging threats to the respiratory system that include SARS, Avian flu, and bioterrorism.
  
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    CPSC 3382 - CLINICAL ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY II

    [2 Credits]
    A continuation of CPSC 3282. Application of echocardiography in the diagnosis of congenital and other cardiac diseases, as well as a discussion of advanced topics including strain rate imaging and 3-D echocardiography
  
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    CPSC 3385 - VASCULAR TECHNOLOGY I

    [3 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course designed to familiarize the student with the use of ultrasound and non-imaging physiologic techniques in the diagnosis of cerebrovascular and peripheral arterial disease.
  
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    CPSC 3388 - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY CLINICS I

    [6 Credits]
    This is the initial clinical experience in echocardiography. Three days per week obtaining echocardiographic views and performing color-flow and spectral Doppler exams.
  
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    CPSC 3395 - RESPIRATORY CLINICS II

    [3 Credits]
    This course is the second of four clinical courses during which students develop the clinical skills necessary to become a competent respiratory care professional. In this course, students will gain competence in the respiratory care of adult patients in critical care units and pediatric patients receiving non-intensive care. Emphasis is placed on introduction of monitoring techniques, blood gas sampling and analysis, mechanical ventilation, patient weaning and extubation, and application of skills learned in CPSC 3285.
  
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    CPSC 4108 - VASCULAR TECHNOLOGY II

    [3 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course designed to familarize the student with the use of ultrasound and non-imaging physiologic techniques in the diagnosis of peripheral venous and abdominal and pelvic vascular disease.
  
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    CPSC 4115 - GERIATRIC RESPIRATORY CARE

    [1 Credit]
    This course is designed to provide the student with an insight into the medical and psychosocial problems encountered by the geriatric population. Lectures are designed to cover the physiologic and pharmacologic implications of aging, describe the unique medical, economic, and sociologic effects of an aging population, discuss delivery of compassionate care, and cover of life issues.
  
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    CPSC 4135 - CRITICAL CARE CONCEPTS II

    [4 Credits]
    This course is designed to teach the student advanced concepts regarding mechanical ventilation techniques, including adult and neonatal ventilators, transport ventilators, and home care ventilators. In addition,students will complete an American Heart Association-approvd course in Advanced Cardiac Life Support.
  
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    CPSC 4145 - RESPIRATORY CLINICS III

    [4 Credits]
    This course is the third of four clinical courses during which students develop the clinical skills necessary to become a competent respiratory care professional. In this course, students will gain competence in the respiratory care of pediatric and neonatal patients in critical care units, patients with chronic pulmonary disease in outpatient clinic settings, and for pediatric and adult patients in need of airway management, including intubation. Emphasis is placed on neonatal and pediatric monitoring techniques, blood gas sampling and analysis, mechanical ventilation, weaning and extubation, intubation, and application of skills learned in CPSC 3285 and CPSC 3395.
  
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    CPSC 4185 - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY CLINICS II

    [3 Credits]
    Continuing clinical experience in two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography.
  
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    CPSC 4195 - VASCULAR CLINICS I

    [3 Credits]
    This is student’s initial clinical experience in vascular technology. Emphasis is on performing extracranial vascular exams.
  
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    CPSC 4205 - HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT

    [1 Credit]
    A study of a topic of current interest in Cardiopulmonary Science, which is not covered in other courses. May be repeated for a maximum of six semesterhours credit with change in topic and permission of the department.
  
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    CPSC 4208 - VASCULAR TECHNOLOGY III

    [2 Credits]
    A case-based course designed to enhance the student’s ability to utilize appropriate protocol in diagnosing vascular disease, as well as interpret vascular ultrasound exams.
  
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    CPSC 4215 - PULMONARY REHABILITATION AND HOME CARE

    [3 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course designed to introduce students to the care of chronically ill patients. Discussions will focus on the delivery of services for hospital-based pulmonary rehabilitation programs, extended care facilities, and home care. Topics include clinical exercise testing, exercise prescriptions, clinical practice guidelines for management of patients who require long-term respiratory care (e.g., oxygen therapy, bronchodilator therapy, mechanical ventilation, ect.).
  
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    CPSC 4225 - PULMONARY DIAGNOSTIC TESTS

    [2 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course covering basic instrumentation and diagnostic techniques employed in assessment of pulmonary functions.
  
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    CPSC 4235 - RESPIRATORY CLINICS IV

    [5 Credits]
    This course is the final of four clinical courses during which students develop the clinical skills necessary to become a competent respiratory care professional. In this course, students will gain competence in the respiratory care of critically ill patients and patients receiving pulmonary diagnostic tests and pulmonary rehabilitation. Emphasis is placed on advanced monitoring and diagnostic techniques, advanced modes of mechanical ventilation, emergency airway management, chronic pulmonary disease management through exercise prescription and education, and application of skills learned in CPSC 3285, 3395, and 4145.
  
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    CPSC 4265 - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY CLINICS III

    [4 Credits]
    Continuing clinical experience in two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography, with additional emphasis on interpretation of echocardiograms.
  
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    CPSC 4275 - VASCULAR CLINICS II

    [4 Credits]
    Clinical instruction in vascular technology, with emphasis on diagnosis of upper and lower extremity arterial disease.
  
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    CPSC 4295 - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION

    [2 Credits]
    Case-based instruction designed to improve the student’s ability to interpret echocardiograms, and to use the appropriate echocardiographic protocol.
  
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    CPSC 4300 - RRT REVIEW

    [4 Credits]
    This course is designed to prepare students to pass the credentialing examinations offered by the National Board for Respiratory Care, Inc. (NBRC) that are required to be awarded the RTT credential and be recognized as a registered respiratory therapist. Students improve their critical thinking skills through case-based lectures and computer simulations that allow students to manage patient problems relevant tot he clinical practice of respiratory care. Emphasis is placed on reviewing all content areas described in the respective NBRC examination content outline matrices.
  
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    CPSC 4310 - POLYSOMNOGRAPHY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed to provide both didactic and laboratory training in polysomnographic technology. Students will become familiar with the basic and advanced aspects of polysomnographic technology including instrumentation setup and calibration, recording and monitoring techniques, obtaining and evaluation high quality sleep recordings, sleep scoring and event recognition, therapeutic interventions, documentation, professional issues, and patient-technologist interactions related to polysomnographic technology. Laboratory sessions will provide practical experience in the skills required to obtain and evaluate high quality sleep recordings.
  
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    CPSC 4320 - RESPIRATORY CLINICS V

    [4 Credits]
    This course is designed to give the student an opportunity to rotate through a sleep lab, provide community outreach in the forms of respiratory services and education related to pulmonary disease management and the respiratory therapy profession, and serve as a teaching assistant. Through patient contact in a sleep lab, students acquire the clinical experiences necessary to deveop the psychomotor skills and clinical competence associated with advanced-level polysomnographic technology. Students also gain teaching and leadership skills as teaching assistant to junior respiratory therapy students dure CPSC 3395 Respiratory Clinics II.
  
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    CPSC 4325 - ADVANCED TOPICS

    [1 Credit]
    This course introduces the student to advanced respiratory therapy practice as an advanced pulmonary function technologist, asthma educator, COPD educator, and advanced critical care specialist. Selected content areas from the respective advanced practice credentialing exams will be presented. Prerequisites: CPSC 3370, 4135, 4215, 4225
  
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    CPSC 4340 - CARDIOVASCULAR REGISTRY REVIEW

    [2 Credits]
    A review course designed to prepare the student for the echocardiography and vascular technology registry exams.
  
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    CPSC 4350 - VASCULAR CLINICS III

    [4 Credits]
    Clinical instruction in vascular technology, with emphasis on ultrasonic examination of upper and lower extremity veins, as well as abdominal arteries and veins, intracranial blood vessels, and hemodialysis access fistulas and grafts
  
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    CPSC 4360 - ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY CLINICS IV

    [4 Credits]
    Two days per week of continuing clinical experience in echocardiography, allowing the student to maintain and improve skills.
  
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    CPSC 4370 - PEDIATRIC ECHOCARDIOGRAPY

    [1 Credit]
    This course will introduce the student to the use of echocardiography in diagnosis of congenital heart disease in children. Prerequisites: CPSC 3282, 3382, 4295
  
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    CPSC 4380 - CLINICAL INQUIRY

    [1 Credit]
    This course is designed to introduce the student to evidence-based medicine and improve each student’s ability to answer a clinical question and give a presentation on a current topic of clinical research.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 1001 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB

    [1 Credit]
  
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    CHEM 1100 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

    [3 Credits]
  
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    CHEM 1101 - GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB II

    [1 Credit]
  
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    CHEM 1200 - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

    [3 Credits]
    INORGANIC CHEMISTRY

Community Service Learning

  
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    CSLE 420 - COMMUNITY SERVICE LEARNING ELECTIVE

    [75-150 Hours]

Degree Candidate

  
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    DIPLOMA AHPG - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA AHPU - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA DENT - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA DNTU - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
  •  

    DIPLOMA GRAD - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA NRSG - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA NRSU - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.
  
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    DIPLOMA PUBH - REGISTERED FOR GRADUATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Student has completed degree requirements, awaiting graduation.

Dental Hygiene

  
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    DHY 3101 - GROSS ANATOMY

    [2 Credits]
    A lecture course to orient the student toward an understanding of the anatomical make-up and integral relationships of the human body and its parts. Particular emphasis is placed on head and neck anatomy. A systematic study is followed by a regional approach to each of the body areas so that the systems are studied in relation to one another.
  
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    DHY 3102 - MORPHOLOGY AND OCCLUSION

    [2 Credits]
    This course is designed to develop the student’s ability to understand and identify the form and function of teeth individually and collectively. It is a lecture and laboratory detailed study of the anatomy of teeth. Topics in this course include anatomical and embryonic differences, developmental disturbances, root structure anomalies and the physiology of mandibular movement as well as an introduction to occlusion. Students gain laboratory exposure by drawing, labeling and identifying specific characteristics on each tooth as well as identifying individual teeth using natural specimens.
  
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    DHY 3103 - FUNDAMENTALS OF DENTAL RADIOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    An introductory course in dental radiology that includes didactic instruction in radiation physics, radiation biology, radiation hygiene, and radiographic and processing techniques. This course also includes an introduction to the radiological interpretation of normal anatomy, caries, periodontal disease and periapical disease. The student received supervision in taking digital intra- and extra-oral radiographs on mannequins, as well as patients. Specific requirements on occlusal, panoramic, and complete series of x rays must be met.
  
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    DHY 3104 - ORAL DIAGNOSIS

    [1 Credit]
    The introductory course in Oral Diagnosis is specially designed for Dental Hygiene I, with emphasis on interpretation of medical history data, physical observations, taking and evaluation of vital signs, soft tissue examination and identification of normal structures, occlusal nomenclature, periodontal examination, charting procedures, uses of diagnostic aids such as an explorer, mirror, transillumination, palpation, percussion and pulp testing. Clinical periods will reinforce didactic learning.
  
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    DHY 3105 - PRE-CLINIC

    [5 Credits]
    A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the fundamentals necessary in preparation for the clinical experience in dental hygiene. Information on the dental/dental hygiene profession, prophylaxis techniques, clinical procedure, patient management, and oral health education is an integral part of the course. Experience that can be applied to the oral cavity is obtained through instrumentation procedures on mannequins.
  
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    DHY 3106 - INFECTIOUS DISEASE CONTROL

    [1 Credit]
    An introductory course that provides instruction in blood-borne infections such as AIDS and hepatitis. The epidemiology and prevention of these diseases and a complete infection control policy is presented in order that the student may function properly in a dental setting. Federal, state, OSHA and LSUHSC policies concerning legal issues are discussed.
  
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    DHY 3107 - OVERVIEW OF THE DENTAL PROFESSION

    [1 Credit]
    An introductory course designed to introduce students to the various disciplines in dentistry. An overview of the dental specialties dental nomenclature is strongly emphasized.
  
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    DHY 3108 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT l

    [1 Credit]
    An introductory course designed to introduce the role of the student as a member of the LSU School of Dentistry and the dental hygiene program. This lecture/seminar course introduces the philosophical concepts of ethics and moral reasoning. Human behavior principles are shared which create an awareness of the issues presented by a culturally diverse student/faculty/patient population. This course also introduces the students to aspects of professional development, such as involvement in professional organizations, and the future of dental hygiene.
  
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    DHY 3201 - MICROBIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is an introduction to the basic principles of bacteriology, mycology, virology and immunology with special emphasis on how they relate to the microbial flora of the oral cavity and to oral disease. Methods of sterilization and disinfection are stressed along with their application to the prevention of cross contamination in the dental office.
  
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    DHY 3202 - GENERAL AND ORAL PHYSIOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    An introductory course that presents a general survey of the basic physiological principles underlying the function of the different organ systems of the human body, including the central and peripheral nervous system, neuromuscular, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal systems. The influence of each of these systems on the oral cavity is presented as a separate group of lectures. Lectures are supplemented by slides and videotaped demonstrations. Legacy Course: DH 3241301 – GENERAL AND ORAL PHYSIOLOGY
  
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    DHY 3203 - HISTOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    icroscopic anatomy of the human body. Functional topics and embryological development are integrated with histology in the lectures. The course is roughly divided into thirds. The first third of the course is devoted to the study of cell biology and the organization of basic tissues. The second portion deals with histology of selected systems. The final third is concerned with detailed development and histology of the oral cavity and teeth. Lectures are supplemented with photographic slides to enhance the students’ appreciation of microscopic anatomy. Legacy Course: DH 3241204 – HISTOLOGY
  
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    DHY 3204 - ORAL HEALTH PROMOTION AND DISEASE PREVENTION

    [2 Credits]
    This is an introductory course that presents the etiology and steps in the prevention of dental diseases. Philosophies of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention are discussed. The development and maintenance of dental disease programs are addressed as they relate to communicating with, educating and motivating patients. Legacy Course: DH 3241601 – PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY
  
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    DHY 3205 - INTRODUCTORY CLINIC

    [3 Credits]
    A clinical course that applies techniques, procedures and information presented in Pre-Clinic. The course consists of the clinical treatment of patients for prophylaxis, in varying degrees of difficulty, complete series of X-rays, fluoride treatments, and oral health instruction. The course is supplemented by scheduled seminars on root planing, special patients, use of power scalers, auxiliary health aids, and laboratory diagnostic tests used in dental practice.
  
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    DHY 3206 - RADIOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION

    [1 Credit]
    This is a comprehensive course in radiographic interpretation of normal anatomy, anomalies, caries, periapical lesions, periodontal disease, cysts, trauma and various pathological lesions of the jaws and associated structures.
  
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    DHY 3208 - PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT II

    [1 Credit]
    The course is designed to facilitate communication concepts and skills, and includes exercises in practical application with the dental patient, and other dental professionals. The student is made aware of the various barriers to successful communication by exposure to concepts of culture, verbal and non-verbal language, and group dynamics. Principles of human behavior affecting the dental hygienist’s relationship with co-workers and patients, the influence of personality types on interpersonal relations, motivation of patients to proper oral health will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to a Professional Codes of Ethics as it relates to patient care.
  
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    DHY 3210 - PAIN CONTROL II-A

    [2 Credits]
    One of 2 courses designed to prepare the student for the management of pain, anxiety, and medical emergencies in the dental practice. This course includes the majority of the LSUSD material pertaining to management of medical emergencies. Didactic and clinical instruction in the use of nitrous-oxide analgesia is included in order to qualify the student for the clinical use of this pain-control modality. Additionally, any applicable medical pathophysiologies will be discussed.
  
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    DHY 4080 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DENTAL HYGIENE

    [1-6 Credits]
    Lecture/Labaratory/preclinic/clinc time distribution to be independently arranged for each course as appropriate. This course offers the student an opportunity to gain additional exposure to specific subject matter covered in the required courses. Enrollment in this course required written consent by the Director of the Program in Dental Hygiene.
  
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    DHY 4101 - PHARMACOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    Pharmacology is the study of drugs: their effects on living system, their uses as therapeutic and diagnostic agents, and their toxicities. Individuals involved in the delivery of health care are in a work environment where drugs are used for medical purposes. Because of this, an understanding of the actions of drugs is required. An appreciation of pharmacology requires the use of knowledge gained in chemistry, biology, anatomy, physiology and pathology. This course will give the student a foundation in basic principles of pharmacology so that they can understand and evaluate new drugs as they are introduced for prescribing and made available as over-the-counter agents for use without a prescription.
  
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    DHY 4102 - GENERAL AND ORAL PATHOLOGY I

    [3 Credits]
    This course educates students regarding the pathologic basis for systemic and oral disease. It includes a consideration of basic principles of pathology as well as specific disease processes. The definition, epidemiology, distribution, morphology, symptoms, etiology, treatment, and prognosis of each disease process are studied. Emphasis is placed on oral, and head and neck pathology.
  
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    DHY 4103 - CLINICAL NUTRITION

    [2 Credits]
    This course consists of techniques for diet assessment, nutritional counseling and patient management. It is designed to increase the student’s skill in developing a comprehensive disease program to treat individual patients. The course format is a combination of lectures, presentation of abstracts, and discussion of current nutritional issues.
  
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    DHY 4104 - PERIODONTICS

    [2 Credits]
    This is a fundamental lecture course in periodontics with emphasis on a basic understanding of the normal and diseased states of the periodontium. An orientation to the concepts of periodontal examination, charting, diagnosis, treatment planning, root planing, soft-tissue curettage, and other surgical therapeutic techniques is presented.
  
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    DHY 4105 - INTERMEDIATE CLINIC

    [4 Credits]
    This is a continuation of clinical treatment of patients from Introductory Clinic with the addition of clinical skills including subgingival adjunctive therapy, tobacco cessation counseling, impressions, study casts, and limited local anesthesia experiences. Scheduled seminars are held to review clinical procedures. Students are assigned to selected departments within the school as well as extramural clinics for observation and participation. The students are also provided the opportunity to attend (Grand Round) presentations in a small-group seminar format.
 

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