Dec 09, 2019  
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Physical Therapy

  
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    PHTH 7131 - MOVEMENT SCIENCES I

    [4 Credits]
    This course introduces the student to basic principlies of kinetics and kinematics of movement, as well as regional anatomy and joint structure and function. Changes throughout the life span as they apply to biomechanics and kinesiology will be examined at a very basic level. Through case studies and applied laboratory sessions, the student will master surface anatomy and palpation skills leading to clinical location, description, and differentiation of all major landmarks and anatomical structures.
  
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    PHTH 7132 - MOVEMENT SCIENCES II

    [4 Credits]
    A continuation of PHTH 7131, this course focuses on the maturation of human movement systems and the application of biomechanical, musculoskeletal and neuromaturational principles in the analysis of lifespan motor development and function. This course content builds upon the study of human movement to look at the human body as a whole with emphasis placed on the interplay of human systems in creating and responding to different movements (gait, transfers, exercise, etc.)
  
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    PHTH 7135 - HUMAN DEVELOPMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

    [3 Credits]
    This course is a study of the process of typical human development across the life span. This course will include motor development in childhood and changes associated with aging with an emphasis on the neuromuscular and musculoskeletal systems.
  
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    PHTH 7140 - PHYSICAL THERAPY NEUROANATOMY

    [4 Credits]
    This course focuses on the anatomy, physiology and biochemistry of the nervous system, including: nomral structure and function of the central, peripheral and autonomic systems; normal and abnormal neurodevelopment. Students learn the neurophysiological mechanisms of pain mediation and the underpinnings of neural mechanism mediating motor control. Case studies will highlight selected nerological conditions for integrating the foundational science with clinical relevance specific to the practice of physical therapy.
  
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    PHTH 7141 - NEUROSCIENCES I

    [1 Credit]
    This course is a continuation of PHTH 7140: Physical Therapy Neuroanatomy with a special focus on normal neurological anatomy and physiology that is vitally pertinent to physical therapy practice. The course will also look at minor pathophysiology of the nervous system in order for the learner to better understand the body’s normal response to injury as well as introducing the nervous system’s mechanisms of neuroplasticity. The student will also be introduced to the neurological screen and exam as a way to apply the content covered in the different exams and to help integrate this material with co-requisite coursework.
  
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    PHTH 7180 - INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

    [1 Credit]
    A course designed to introduce the student to the clinical education component of the program. The course covers general information about the role of the student physical therapist in the clinic setting, professionalism, clinical education process, expectations of clinical education (school, student, and clinic site), and legal ramifications of patient care and student learning. The practicum of the course is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the material presented during the first and concurrent semesters of study.
  
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    PHTH 7203 - EVIDENCED-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY III: CLINICAL ANALYSES

    [2 Credits]
    This course further develops and elaborates on tools and procedures used in clinical decision-making and evidence-based practice. Previously learned skills in critical literature review and measurement science are applied to the issues of clinical epidemiology, hypothesis testing and outcomes measurement in the context of physical therapy practice.
  
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    PHTH 7204 - EVIDENCE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY IV: RESEARCH ANALYSES

    [3 Credits]
    Students apply the foundations of research methodology learned for clinical practice to the principles of scientific research. The theory and basis of hypothesis testing is reviewed in the context of research design. Students receive guidelines for and begin work on their chosen capstone project.
  
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    PHTH 7213 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY III

    [2 Credits]
    Professional development continues as students explore the psychosocial aspects of providing healthcare to others. Students also study the basic learning theories and teaching methods that they will utilize in clinical education of patients/ clients, students and peers; and demonstrate competency in their application of this material in the context of peer-to-peer, classroom teaching.
  
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    PHTH 7233 - THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS

    [3 Credits]
    This course focuses on therapeutic intervention aimed at restoring function and maximizing outcomes in a variety of patient populations. Foundations and techniques of therapeutic interventions are explored in the classroom and applied by students in the laboratory settings.
  
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    PHTH 7234 - PROSTHETICS & ORTHOTICS IN PT

    [2 Credits]
    This course will focus on assessment and intervention of patients who require use of prosthetics and orthotics of enhance function and mobility. This course will apply the knowledge of gait kinematics and upper extremity function as they relate to the prescription, fabrication, and use of prosthetics and orthotics.
  
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    PHTH 7240 - MOTOR BEHAVIOR

    [4 Credits]
    This course integrates information from the fields of neuroscience, exercise science, cognitive and sport psychology to build an evidence-based foundation for the evaluation and management of movement dysfunction in physical therapy practice. Students review and debate the evidence and assumptions underlying contemporary theories of motor control and learning. Standardrized clinical tools for the assessment of movement dysfunction and its causes are learned and applied by students in laboratory and clinical settings across a variety of patient populations.
  
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    PHTH 7242 - NEUROSCIENCES II

    [2 Credits]
    This course is an introductory study of functional neuroanatomy and neuropathology correlated with specific regional neuropathological conditions. Selected neuropathologies and injuries are studied with respect to etiology, epidemiology, and clinical signs and symptoms. Particular focus is given to neural substrates of cognitive, perceptual, sensory, and motor functions and dysfunctions that arise as consequences of pathology or injury. Case studies are utilized to assist students’ integration of functional neuroanatomy with clinical presentation.
  
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    PHTH 7243 - NEUROSCIENCES III

    [2 Credits]
    This course is a continuation of PHTH 7241 with more in depth study of functional neuroanatomy and neuropathology of specific diagnoses commonly encountered in physical therapy practice. This course is taught in conjunction with PHTH 7271 to study the full spectrum of patient management. These selected neuropathologies and injuries are studied with special emphasis placed on clinical signs and symptoms, medical diagnosis, radiological examination, medical and pharmacological management and prognosis. Case studies are utilized to assist students’ integration of functional neuroanatomy, etiology, epidemiology, and medical evaluation and assessment with clinical presentation.
  
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    PHTH 7250 - DIAGNOSIS & MANAGEMENT IN CARDIOPULMONARY DYSFUNCTION

    [4 Credits]
    This course provides the student with an overview of cardiovascular and pulmonary systems pathologies, medical diagnosis and management; and then focuses on physical therapy diagnosis and management of related physiological and movement dysfunctions. Case studies and laboratory practice facilitate the students’ development of skills in examination, assessment, and interventions aimed at restoration of cardiopulmonary health and maximization of functional independence.
  
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    PHTH 7261 - DIAGNOSIS & MANAGEMENT IN MUSCULOSKELETAL DYSFUNCTION I

    [3 Credits]
    Students examine the principles of orthopaedic medicine and study the etiology, diagnosis, and surgical management of commonly encountered musculoskeletal pathologies across the lifespan. Students learn methods of selective tissue evaluation and mobilization, and apply exercise approaches for the therapeutic management of musculoskeletal dysfunction. Case studies, laboratory and clinic practice facilitate the development of applied skills.
  
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    PHTH 7262 - DIAGNOSIS & MANGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH MUSCULOSKELETAL DYSFUNCTION II

    [4 Credits]
    Students expand their knowledge and skills in the management of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction through the application of maual therapy and interventions that integrate the principles of mechanics, arthrokinematics and osteokinematics. They learn to apply selected modalities in the management of musculoskeletal dysfunction and pain. Case studies and laboratory practice facilitate development of skills in musculoskeletal evaluation, examination, and interventions along with integration of related curricular topics.
  
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    PHTH 7271 - DIAGNOSIS & MANAGEMENT OF NEUROMUSCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    [4 Credits]
    Applying the foundational knowledge from neuroscience and movement science courses, students learn to diagnose and manage movement dysfunction in adults and children with cognitive, behavioral, and neuro-motor deficits.
  
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    PHTH 7280 - CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

    [3 Credits]
    A clinical course consisting of 320 clock hours of clinical experience in a physical therapy setting. The practicum of the course is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the material presented during the first year of study.
  
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    PHTH 7300 - WELLNESS: PREVENTION AND HEALTH PROMOTION

    [2 Credits]
    Students will learn the role of physical therapy in assessing the health needs of individuals, groups and communities through the development of screening programs and promoting healthy lifestyles. The students will develop a wellness program that addresses preventative medicine, nutrition, and benefits of exercise to enhance the healthy lifestyle of a wellness client. Current trends and concepts of wellness in prevention and health promotion will be addressed.
  
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    PHTH 7305 - EVIDENCE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY V: RESEARCH ANALYSES

    [2 Credits]
    Students apply the foundations of research previously introduced to the development of clinical case studies and formal research proposals. Work on the capstone projects will continue.
  
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    PHTH 7306 - EVIDENCE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY VI: CAPSTONE COMPLETION & DEFENSE

    [2 Credits]
    Students complete, present and defend the capstone project.
  
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    PHTH 7315 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE PHYSICAL THERAPY IV

    [2 Credits]
    This course further focuses on the preparation of students to enter physical therapy practice. Students will receive informalion on multiple aspects of entering the profession of physical therapy including information about licensure, attainment and retention of employment, professional organization membership, and other opportunities such as mentoring programs, residency and fellowship programs, as well as specialization. Students will learn how to develop a professional resume and prepare for a professional interview. Students will be given the opportunity to perform mock interviews with local clinicians.
  
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    PHTH 7316 - PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN PHYSICAL THERAPY V

    [2 Credits]
    This course focuses on the many specific roles and responsibilities of individuals within the field of physical therapy practice. Students will further examine the structure of the professional organization with emphasis on opportunity and levels of involvement. The students will receive in depth training on how to educate in the clinical setting with emphasis on clinical instruction of students. The students will also learn about various avenues for patient and professional advocacy as well as service opportunities in the community and profession.
  
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    PHTH 7350 - DIAGNOSIS & MANAGEMENT OF INTEGUMENTARY DYSFUNCTION

    [2 Credits]
    This course provides the student with an overview of integumentary system pathologies, medical diagnosis and management and focuses on physical therapy diagnosis and management of related physiological and movement dysfunctions. Case studies and laboratory practice will facilitate the students’ development of skills in examination, assessment, and interventions aimed at restoration of integumentary health and maximization of functional independence.
  
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    PHTH 7381 - CLINICAL INTERNSHIP I

    [4 Credits]
    A clinical course providing students with a full-time clinical experience in a mainly orthopedic setting. The practicum of the course is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the material presented during the first two years of study.
  
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    PHTH 7382 - CLINICAL INTERNSHIP II

    [4 Credits]
    A 10 week clinical providing students with a full-time clinical experience in a variety acute, inpatient, outpatient and long-term clinical settings. The practicum of the course is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the material presented to date in the curriculum.
  
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    PHTH 7383 - CLINICAL INTERNSHIP III

    [4 Credits]
    A 10-week clinical providing students with a fulltime clinical experience in a variety acute, inpatient, outpatient, and long-term clinical settings. The practicum of the course is designed to provide clinical reinforcement of the material presented to date in the curriculum.
  
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    PHTH 7390 - HEALTH POLICY I: MICROALLOCATION OF HEALTHCARE GOODS AND SERVICES

    [1 Credit]
    Students will learn about the structure, policy, and system of health insurance in the context of physical therapy practice and health care in general. The legal structure of health care organizations and the systems that serve them are reviewed along with fair and legal avenues for providing pro bono services. Ethics and healthcare allocation will also be discussed as it relates to providing physical therapy services.
  
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    PHTH 7391 - ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY I

    [2 Credits]
    Students explore topics essential to effective management within health care organizations and operations. Students engage in clinical administrative simulations designed to develop management skills and facilitate administrative problem solving.
  
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    PHTH 7392 - ADMINISTRATIVE SKILLS IN PHYSICAL THERAY II

    [2 Credits]
    As a continuation of PHTH 7391, students apply their knowledge of administration to the exercise of designing a physical therapy practice in one of a variety of healthcare environments.
  
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    PHTH 7393 - HEALTH POLICY II: MACRO ALLOCATION OF HEALTHCARE GOODS AND SERVICES

    [1 Credit]
    This is a fully problem-based learning course where students will learn about healthcare delivery systems and physical therapy practice from a global perspective. Issues surrounding cost, access, and quality of health care will be examined and model healthcare delivery systems from various countries will be reviewed. A brief historical review of national and global healthcare policy along with current healthcare policy reform will be evaluated.
  
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    PHTH 7400 - PRACTICUM IN CLIENT AND PEER TEACHING

    [2 Credits]
    This is a classroom and clinic based course in which students practice the application of their teaching skills in the context of patient care and in the context of clinical teaching to peers. Second year students will participate in teaching of basic skills to first year in DPT 7102. Before going into the clinics where they will apply teaching principles in the context of patient and family education. Finally, students will develop and present and educative review of the literature on a topic of their choice to faculty and peers.
  
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    PHTH 7401 - PRACTICUM IN INTEGRATIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE I

    [4 Credits]
    The first of two problem-based courses in which students manage simulated patient cases designed to foster integration of all aspects of the doctoral curriculum in physical therapy.
  
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    PHTH 7402 - PRACTICUM IN INTEGRATIVE CLINICAL PRACTICE II

    [4 Credits]
    The second of two problem-based courses in which students manage simulated patient cases designed to foster integration of all aspects of the doctoral curriculum in physical therapy.
  
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    PHTH 7800 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This is an optional learning experience. Students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, engage in the in-depth study of advanced topics related to the practice and profession of physical therapy. (This course may be repeated for a total of 12 credits).

Physician Assistant

  
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    PYAS 6550 - PATIENT EVALUATION

    [3 Credits]
    Patient Evaluation is a lecture/lab course designed to give the entry-level physician assistant student in-depth instruction in the appropriate techniques of soliciting, organizing and interpreting of patient-specific medical information from patients of all ages, cultures, socioeconomic backgrounds and abilities. The laboratory portion of the course will allow the participants to practice and refine the skills presented in the didactic portion of the course.
  
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    PYAS 6551 - PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE

    [2 Credits]
    Physician Assistant Professional Practice is an instructional course designed to introduce the entry level physician assistant student to the unique origins, development, practice laws and workforce trends of the profession. This course will allow the student to develop a thorough understanding of the role of the physician assistant in health care delivery and the scope of PA practice, health law, the physician assistand profession its history. The course will emphasize the PA’s role in healthcare delivery as a member of an interdisciplinary team.
  
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    PYAS 6552 - CLINICAL DIAGNOSTICS

    [3 Credits]
    Clinical Diagnostics is a lecture course with three components: radiologic study ordering and interpretation, ECG ordering and interpretation, and laboratory study ordering, performance and interpretation. This course provides skills in ordering and interpreting lab values from chemistry, hematology, immunology, microbiology, parasitology, virology, genetics, and mycology testing. Basic ECG and x-ray interpretation skills are introduced in preparation for clinical externships.
  
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    PYAS 6553 - PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS

    [4 Credits]
    This course uses lectures and laboratory activities to build the physical examination skills required of physician assistants to beginning clinical rotations. Instruction will introduce the information needed to understand illness and inquiry experienced by persons across the lifespan, the structure and skills required to identify and document the physical manifestations of disease during the physical exam, and the relationship between anatomy, physiology and the pathophysiologic changes occurring within major body/organ systems as a result of illness and injury.
  
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    PYAS 6554 - PATHOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Pathology is a lecture based course designed to introduce the entry level physician assistant student to human disease processes, their origins, mechanisms or action and effects on the human body with emphasis on the clinical manifestations of the disease process. The course will give the student the opportunity to analyze the effects of pathological conditions on normal physiology, to relate a patient’s presenting signs and symptoms to a pathologic condition and to develop techniques to counsel patients on modifiable risk factors for disease processes.
  
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    PYAS 6555 - CLINICAL MEDICINE I

    [7 Credits]
    Clinical Medicine I is a lecture/lab course designed to build upon the skills developed in Patient Evaluation and Physical Diagnosis, Differential Diagnosis and the basic sciences. This course covers the principles of evaluation and management of general medical conditions in a systems based-approach. Lecture, case studies, small-group discussions and independent studies are used to incorporate pre-requisite and co-requisite knowledge of pathophysiology, patient evaluation and diagnostic medicine in order to reach appropriate patient assessments.
  
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    PYAS 6556 - CLINICAL MEDICINE II

    [8 Credits]
    This course is designed to prepare the student for supervised clinical practice, and is a continuation of Clinical Medicine I. The student will be given the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to: recognize and understand clinical signs and symptoms of diseases; interpret results obtained by analysis of body tissues and fluids; interpret basic radiographic procedures; and utilize clinical data in the management of medical problems. Problem-based learning techniques will be used in the laboratory portion of the course to assist the student in the refinement of clinical problem solving skills.
  
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    PYAS 6557 - CLINICAL PRACTICE ISSUES

    [2 Credits]
    Clinical Practice Issues is a lecture based course covering advanced practice issues affecting the physician assistant profession. Topics include, but will not be limited to: billing and coding, hospital credentials, state, national and international practice acts and issues of professionalism. The students will have the opportunity to work individually and in small groups on projects designed to increase their familiarity with issues facing the clinical practitioner.
  
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    PYAS 6558 - DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

    [3 Credits]
    Differential Diagnosis is a lecture based course designed to build upon the skills developed in Patient Evaluation and Physical Diagnosis. The course will provide instruction in the development of a thorough, patient appropriate differential diagnosis. Medical decision making based on anatomy, physiology, pathology and the history and clinical presentation will be stressed. Students will be challenged to develop critical thinking skills using case-studies based on actual patient presentations.
  
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    PYAS 6559 - FAMILY MEDICINE CLERKSHIP

    [6 Credits]
    The Family Medicine Clerkship is designed to introduce the student to healthcare in the Family Practice setting. The students will be given the opportunity: understand and manage patient problems in a primary care setting; understand the broad base of knowledge required for the primary care setting; apply this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the primary care setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence-based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (8-week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6560 - INTERNAL MEDICINE CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The Internal Medicine Clerkship is designed to introduce the student to healthcare in the Internal Medicine Practice setting. The student will be given the opportunity to: understand and manage patient problems in an internal medicine setting; understand the broad base of knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the internal medicine setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence-based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4 week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6561 - PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The Pediatric Clerkship is designed to introduce the student to healthcare in the Pediatric Practice setting. The student will be given the opportunity to: understand and manage patient problems in a pediatric care setting; understand the broad base of knowledge required for the pediatric care setting; applyy this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the pediatric care setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of pediatric patients; apply principles of evidence-based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4 week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6562 - RESEARCH METHODS I

    [2 Credits]
    Research Methods I is a lecture based course designed to introduce the entry level physician assistant student to basic research techniques. The course will focus on developing proficiency in searching and interpretations of current medical literature. This course is the first course in the preparation of the student for the capstone project. All students will be assigned an individual factulty mentor to guide their progress through research skill development. The goals of this course are to equip the student with the skills needed to assess the literature for evidence-based information, to develope medical writing skills and to develop life long practices of critical analysis of the medical literature for evidence based treatment practices.
  
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    PYAS 6563 - SEMINAR I

    [1 Credit]
    One seminar course is taken each semester of the clinical (second) year of PA school. This discussion based course meets one day each month when students return from clinical rotations. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience. Included in the mandatory attendance course will be case presentations, end of rotation exams, meetings with research faculty and faculty advisor. Students will also be required to submit 2 reflective journaling pieces for each 4 week rotation, to learn from educational and practical experiences and to develop the skills of critical reflection.
  
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    PYAS 6564 - WOMEN’S HEALTH CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The Women’s Helath Clerkship is designed to introduce the student to healthcare in the Women’s Health Practice setting. The student will be given the opportunity to: understand the broad base of knowledge required for Women’s Health care setting; apply this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the Women’s Health setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence-based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publications; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4-week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6565 - GENERAL SURGERY CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The Gernal Surgery Clerkship is designedto introduce the student to healthcare in the general surgery practice setting. The student will be given the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to: understand the broad base of knowledge required for the general surgery care setting; apply this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the general surgery care setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in te management of surgery patients; apply principles of evidence based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4 week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6566 - PSYCHIATRIC CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The student will be given the opportunity to: understand and manage patient problems in a psychiatric care setting; understand the broad base of knowledge required for the psychiatric care setting; apply this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the psychiatric care setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4 week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6567 - EMERGENCY MEDICINE CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    The emergency medicine clerkship is designed to introduce the student to healthcare in the emergency medicine practice setting. The setting will be given this opportunity to: understand and manage patient problems in an emergency care setting; understand the broad base of knowledge required for the emergency care setting; apply this knowledge to benefit the physician and patient in the emergency care setting; apply previously acquired knowledge in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence based medicine; apply data gathering techniques on unusual patient conditions for the purpose of publication; and participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials. (4 week rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6568 - CLINICAL PRECEPTORSHIP

    [6 Credits]
    This eight week rotation may be completed in any subspecialty chosen by the student with the approval of the clinical rotation coordinator. The student will be given the opportunity to: prepare and present patient records and a problem list in an organized fashion appropriate for the subspecialty service; assist in all particulars delegated by the subspecialist; apply previously acquired problem solving skills in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence based medicine; participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials; and make written and oral presentations on selected patient conditions. (8 weeks rotation)
  
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    PYAS 6569 - SEMINAR II

    [1 Credit]
    One seminar course is taken each semester of the clinical (second) year of PA school. This discussion based course meets one day each month when students return from clinical rotations. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience. Included in the mandatory attendance course will be case presentations, end of rotation exams, meeting with research faculty and faculty advisor. Students will also be required to submit 2 reflective journaling pieces for each 4 week rotation, to learn from educational and practical experiences and to develope the skills of critical reflection.
  
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    PYAS 6570 - RESEARCH METHODS II

    [2 Credits]
    Research Methods II is a lecture based course designed to continue the entry level physician assistant student’s proficiency in research. This course will further refine skills in literature analysis and the formatting of conclusions for the evidence based practice of evaluation and management of disease process. Upon completion of this course, the student will produce a complete literature review for the Capstone Project. The course will focus on increasing proficiency in searching and interpretation of current medical literature. All students will be assigned to an individual faculty mentor to guide their progress through research skill development.
  
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    PYAS 6571 - CULTURE AND DIVERSITY

    [3 Credits]
    Culture and Diversity for Physician Assistant Practice is a lecture based course designed to increase the physician assistant students awareness of the complexities of providing healthcare to persons from diverse cultural backgrounds. This course will explore various cultural healing practices and encourage students to explore their own cultural experiences and bias. The goal of this course is to explore cultural diversity and the challenges presented to the healthcare professional and to increase the cultural competency of the developing physician assistant.
  
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    PYAS 6572 - HEALTH PROMOTION AND DISEASE PREVENTION

    [3 Credits]
    Health Promotion and Disease Prevention is a lecture based course in which the student will be given the opportunity to: apply practical knowledge concerning the practice of preventive medicine; identify resources that provide preventive and community health services; identify sources of information pertaining to legal regulations on reportable diseases or health hazards; and apply these and other acquired skills in the education of patients concerning medical, psychological, surgical, and terminal illnesses.
  
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    PYAS 6573 - CLINICAL PSYCHIATRY

    [3 Credits]
    Clinical Psychiatry will focus on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with psychiatric conditions within the broader context of primary care medicine. The course will emphasize the connection between the acquisition of basic clinical science information and its application in direct patient care. The most current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association will be used to introduce the student to the classification of psychiatric disorders and the multi-axial approach to the assessment of the patient. Pharmacological interventions focus on an understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of psychiatric conditions.
  
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    PYAS 6574 - CLINICAL GENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    Clinical Genetics is a lecture based course designed to provide the entry level physician assistant student with a basic understanding of medical genetics so that they can begin the process of developing into a knowledgable, competent, healthcare practitioner. The course will review basic moleecular terminology and inheritance patterns. The student will recieve instruction in various diagnostic techniques associated with medical genetics. Development and teratogenesis will also be covered. The remainder of the course will be focused on the identification of select clinical genetic topics, their clinical presentations, treatment options and any ethical issues associated with the manifestation or treatment of the disorder. Included will be instruction pertaining to the ethical, legal and social issues of select genetic disorders.
  
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    PYAS 6575 - CLINICAL ETHICS

    [3 Credits]
    Clinical Ethics for the Physician Assistant is a lecture based course designed to introduce the entry level physician assistant student to ethical dilemmas encountered in clinical practice. The course will be structured such that the student will be able to identify, analyze, and develop a plan to resolve common ethical dilemma. The course will include instruction in the principles of beneficence and non-malificence, respect for for autonomy, loyalty, and fairness. Students will examine their role as health care provider in relation to confidentiality, informed consent, end-of-life issues and patients’ rights. The students will also be introduced to the ethics of clinical research, and the legal aspects of participating in clinical research.
  
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    PYAS 6576 - SEMINAR III

    [1 Credit]
    One seminar course is taken each semester of the clinical (second) year of PA school. This discussion based course meets one day each month when the students return from clinical rotations. Students present clinical cases, reflect on clinical experiences, and prepare for the next clinical experience. Included in the mandatory attendance course will be case presentations, end of rotation exams, meetings with research faculty and faculty advisor. Students will also be required to submit 2 reflective journaling pieces for each 4 week rotation, to learn from educational and practical experiences and to develop the skills of critical reflection.
  
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    PYAS 6577 - CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Clinical Pharmacology will require the student to: identify the classes of drugs used to treat diseases commonly encountered in primary care setting; identify classes of drugs commonly used to manage emergent conditions; recognize the prototype and commonly used drugs in each class; identify the basic pharmacodynamic properties of each class of drugs and the mechanism of action and important consequences of useing each class of drugs; recognize the signs and symptoms of common adverse effects and of possible toxic of life-threatening effects; identify precautions or contradictions to the use of a drug; identify significant drug-drug interactions; recognize the importance of patient education in determining compliance, avoidance of potential problems, and success of therapy; apply previously acquired statistical and critical thinking skills to evaluate literature data; use resource materials for determinging proper usage of chemotherapeutic agents; and understand the role of the physician assistant in writing prescriptions.
  
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    PYAS 6578 - CAPSTONE PROJECT FOR PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS

    [1 Credit]
    This course provides opportunity for completion of the Capstone project initiated in Research Methods I and II. The student will collaborate with the previously assigned mentor to complete an evidence based project with clinical implications. The final project will be a poster or oral presentation that reviews the current evidence based medical literature and answers a clinically oriented question. The project must be presented in the class and to faculty orally and must be submitted in a written form of publishable quality.
  
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    PYAS 6579 - ELECTIVE CLERKSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    This four-week rotation may be completed in any subspecialty chosen by the student with the approval of the clinical rotation coordinator. The student will be given the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to: prepare and present patient records and a problem list in an organized fashion appropriate for the subspecialty service; understand the indications, contraindications, possible complications, and limitations in the treatment of conditions treated by the subspecialist; understand the indications and limitations of various diagnostic procedures; assist effectively with necessary procedures in the pre- and post-operative periods if applicable; assist in all particulars delegated by the subspecialist; apply previously acquired problem-solving skills in the management of patients; apply principles of evidence-based medicine; participate in designing and/or collecting data in clinical trials; and make written and oral presentations on selected patient conditions. (4-week rotation)

Physiology

  
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    PHYSIO 100 - HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    [86 Hours]
    The course consists of lectures, correlated laboratory experiments, and demonstrations. Principles of cellular and organ function and regulation of the various systems are studied. Clinical correlation lectures point out the derangements of normal function that may lead to disease. The importance of quantitative measurements of biological functions in physiology and medicine is emphasized. Major topics in the course include muscle action, bioelectric phenomena, peripheral somatic and autonomic nervous systems and reflexes, heart and circulation, respiration, kidney function, water and electrolyte balance, gastrointestinal function, endocrine function, metabolism, temperature regulation, etc. Laboratory experiments emphasize precision in observation, analysis, and interpretation of data. The topics studied in the laboratory and presented in demonstrations are correlated with lectures and conferences.
  
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    PHYSIO 201 - RESEARCH IN PHYSIOLOGY

    [1-9 Credits]
    A research course designed to acquaint new graduate students with a research laboratory. This represents research credit before the qualifying process.
  
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    PHYSIO 205 - BASIC PHYSIOLOGY

    [6 Credits]
    Function of tissues, organs, and organ systems; mechanisms of control and integration of the various functions. An introduction to the pathophysiology of some diseases will be included.
  
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    PHYSIO 212 - CARDIOVASCULAR PHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course covers normal function and pathophysiology of the heart and circulation. Emphasis will be placed on using the literature to gain a greater depth of understanding of cardiovascular function.
  
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    PHYSIO 216 - ENDOCRINOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    The focus of this course is the in depth understanding of the neuroendocrine mechnisms that regulate organ function. The format of the session will be active discussion of selected current topics covering novel aspects related to hormone secretion, signaling and cellular effects and their regulation. Reading assignments will be made based on recent review articles and these will used to expand basic endocrine physiology concepts. Final grade will be based on two essay question-based exams and on an oral presentation of a topic selected by the student based on her/his particular research or discipline interests. (This is the same course as Biochemistry 216).
  
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    PHYSIO 220 - MEDICAL SPANISH

    [2 Credits]
    This course focuses on teaching basic terminology and phraseology used during the medical interview and physical exam. The course provides the opportunity for students to learn more about the Hispanic culture. Lectures are combined with mock interviews and exams among the students or with invited “patients.” Basic knowledge of the Spanish language assessed by the course director is required for participation. The elective prepares students with basic communication skills necessary to interview Spanish-speaking patients. This elective is open to all LSUHSC-NO students.
  
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    PHYSIO 220 - MEDICAL SPANISH (PASS/FAIL)

    [30 Hours]
    This course focuses on teaching basic terminology and phraseology used during the medical interview and physical exam. The course provides the opportunity for students to learn more about the Hispanic culture. Lectures are combined with mock interviews and exams among the students or with invited “patients.” Basic knowledge of the Spanish language assessed by the course director is required for participation. The elective prepares students with basic communication skills necessary to interview Spanish-speaking patients. This elective is open to all LSUHSC-NO students.
  
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    PHYSIO 221 - TECHNOLOGY FOR BIOMEDICAL RESEARCH

    [2 Credits]
    This course teaches a number of advanced technologies in modern biomedical research. The course introduces the principles, instrumentations and applications of these technologies, so that the students learn how to utilize them in their research. The class will meet once a week for a lecture (2 hours 30 minutes), immediately followed by the lab visit (-30 minutes). The grade will be based on the oral presentation and final essay of a proposed research project related to his/her research interests. Second-year graduate students are preferred.
  
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    PHYSIO 250 - SCIENTIFIC WRITING FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

    [2 Credits]
    Two hours of lecture discussion per week. Topics covered include grammar, usage, and writing style; writing and submitting articles to scientific journals; writing research proposals, grant applications, dissertations, abstracts and test questions; and preparing curriculum vitae. Students must contribute portions of their ongoing writing projects for use in class discussions.
  
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    PHYSIO 289 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN PHYSIOLOGY

    [1-4 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory time distribution to be independently arranged for each course as appropriate. An opportunity to explore, in an organized format and under supervision, specialized areas or specific subjects not adequately covered in other scheduled courses. By permission of the Head of the Department of Physiology only.
  
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    PHYSIO 290 - PHYSIOLOGY JOURNAL CLUB

    [1 Credit]
    A weekly course designed for graduate students in the reading and application of current scientific literature related to systems in physiology.
  
  •  

    PHYSIO 299 - SEMINAR IN PHYSIOLOGY

    [1 Credit]
    A maximum of four credits towards the PhD may be earned.
  
  •  

    PHYSIO 300 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-6 Credits]
    Research related work for PhD degree students prior to passing Preliminary Exam.
  
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    PHYSIO 400 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Research related work for PhD candidates.
  
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    PHYSIO 420 - CLINICAL CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCE

    [152 Hours]
    resentations, and the opportunity to observe and interpret data from clinical procedures such as Swan Ganz catheterization and cardiac imaging. The course reinforces the students’ knowledge of cardiac and vascular physiology and pharmacology. Students also investigate current clinical topics in cardiovascular research, and gain experience in critically evaluating the medical literature.
  
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    PHYSIO 498 - PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    Legacy Course: PHYS 498A001 – RESEARCH PHYSIOLOGY
  
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    PHYSIO 999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Students may register for “Exam Only” when they have completed their Preliminary Exam and expect to complete PhD requirements and graduate within 3 semesters. Students are allowed to register for “Exam Only” for a maximum of 3 semesters.
  
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    PHYSIO 3123 - HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    [4 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory course covering general human physiology.
  
  •  

    PHYSIO 6523 - HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    [4 Credits]
    Lecture based course covering physiology of the cell, tissue, organ and body systems with emphasis on physiological changes associated with selected pathological conditions.

Prosthodontics

  
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    PROS 5501 - TMJ ROTATION

    [12 Credits]
    Legacy Course: PROS 5501001 – TMJ ROTATION
  
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    PROS 5502 - PROSTHODONTIC LITERATURE REVIEW

    [1-2 Credits]
    This bibliography is divided into four main sections. (A) Complete Removable Prosthodontics; (B) Fixed Prosthodontics; (C) Partial Removable Prosthodontics; (D) Maxillofacial Prosthodontics. This divides Prosthodontics for systematic study. In actuality, all the sections are applicable during every clinical eventuality. It is hoped that the students will, with experience, recognize and use this comprehensive knowledge and approach in their practice.
  
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    PROS 5503 - PROSTHODONTIC TREATMENT PLANNING SEMINAR

    [1-2 Credits]
    All postgraduate students, on a rotational basis, will conduct Treatment Planning Seminars. The general format will consist of presentation of data; review of the clinical situation by means of patient analysis, copies of the periodontal charting, projected Kodachrome slides and radiographs, and study casts (mounting optional); detailed diagnosis; enumeration of etiologic factors; and a comprehensive and detailed treatment plan. If treatment has commenced, procedures and results to date shall be presented both verbally and with visual aids.
  
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    PROS 5504 - PROSTHODONTIC JOURNAL CLUB

    [1-2 Credits]
    The students are responsible for articles appearing in the prior months or next most recent issues of the assigned periodicals that are pertinent to the sciences, art and practice of prosthodontics. Each student will legibly abstract the selected articles on one side only of 5 X 8 index cards, and will submit these cards to the postgraduate secretary on the Tuesday preceding the seminar for collation, duplication, and distribution to the other participants. Submission of abstracts of articles not assigned, but felt to be of interest of the group, is encouraged.
  
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    PROS 5506 - CLINICAL MANAGEMENT OF MANDIBULAR LOCOMOTOR SYSTEM DYSFUNCTION

    [1-2 Credits]
    Clinical management of locomotor system dysfunction is presented in the traditional lecture format. TMJ diagnosis and conservative treatment techniques are presented to a variety of dental specialty residents. Current views of pain management for Temporomandibular Disorder problems are discussed. Various types of occlusal stent therapies and their proper use are presented. This course is presented concurrently with PROS 5505 & PROS 5501
  
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    PROS 5507 - PERIODONTIAL-PROSTHESIS

    [1 Credit]
    The purpose of these seminars is to discuss the treatment of the severely periodontally involved patient and present the basic principle of prosthodontics in the treatment thereof. Current concepts, techniques and theories will be studied based on all scientific and clinical evidence available. Further, a review of the literature will be coordinated through the seminars.
  
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    PROS 5511 - PROSTHODONTIC PRACTICUM

    [2-12 Credits]
    During the time spent by the dental student in pre-clinical and clinical removable prosthodontics, the majority of effort is directed towards learning a specific technique or philosophy in the fabrication of both removable partial and complete dentures. The time allotted during those courses precludes the exposure of the student to other techniques. The student should be given the opportunity for reinforcement in these techniques.
  
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    PROS 5514 - PRINCIPLES OF PROSTHODONTICS

    [1-2 Credits]
    Students from various backgrounds need to be introduced to specific philosophies and techniques which will be taught during their program. This course will allow the student to be reevaluated as to his strengths in prosthodontics and gain insight into techniques required in specialized cases, i.e., articulators, occlusion and mandibular movements, dental implants and various aspects of esthetics.
  
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    PROS 5516 - RESEARCH

    [1-2 Credits]
    The students will perform a research project through selecting a topic performing a literature search, formulating an experimental design, collecting data, and performing appropriate statistical analysis, interpreting the results, and presenting the research both orally and written. The research will give the student an appreciation of the effort needed to produce quality research. In addition the research will assist the student in analyzing scientific and professional literature
  
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    PROS 5517 - CONJOINT TREATMENT PLANNING

    [1-2 Credits]
    This course will be presented in the group seminar format. The course will be scheduled irregularly as treatment plans evolve. It consists of patient case presentations of patients both finished and in treatment. All disciplines of and dental specialties are invited to present problem, routine, and board exam patients.

Psychology

  
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    PSCH 1000 - GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
  
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    PSCH 1100 - PSYCHOLOGY ELECGIVE

    [3 Credits]
    Psychology Elective
  
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    PSCH 2000 - ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
    Advanced Psychology Elective
  
  •  

    PSCH 3044 - ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    An introduction to personality maladjustment and mental disorder.

Psychiatry

  
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    PSYC 100 - INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND DEVELOPMENT

    [18 Hours]
    Students will explore theories of human behavior and stages of development from infancy to late adulthood within the context of medical practice. Students will learn components of psychosocial assessments and explore the professional boundaries of the doctor-patient relationship. Students will learn how to use motivational interviewing to encourage behavior change in their patients. Additional topics will include normal secual development and paraphilias, cultural issues, social issues, and ethical issues, all as the pertain to human behavior and medical practice.
 

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