Dec 09, 2019  
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Dentistry, DDS or DMD

  
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    DENT 4106 - TMJ ROTATION

    [12 Credits]
    The fourth-year dental student attends three clinical sessions in the LSU TMJ Clinic where he/she participates actively in the evaluation and management of temporomandibular disorders. (Department of Prosthodontics)
  
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    DENT 4107 - RURAL PRACTICE ROTATION

    [136 Credits]
    Students spend approximately 125 hours in federally qualified health care clinic in Independence, La.; at the Huey P. Long Hospital in Alexandria, La. and also spend time at the Lafayette Community Health Center in Lafayette, La. These experiences provide an excellent opportunity for students to expand their exposure to preventive, restorative, and oral-surgery experiences in a rural clinic environment. The course is designed to introduce students to the provision of health care services in Louisiana communities with underserved, high-need populations. (Department of Comprehensive Dentistry
  
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    DENT 4108 - ADVANCED TREATMENT PLANNING SEMINAR

    [40 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to expand student thinking in the arena of treatment planning; to change his/her focus from a “requirement mindset,” what L.D. Pankey describes as a “tooth dentist,” to a mindset that takes into consideration the overall oral health and perceived needs/desires of the patient, what Pankey describes as a “whole person” dentist. The course explores important questions/issues related to “advanced” clinical areas of dentistry such as esthetics, implants, use of attachments, occlusal rehabilitation, and the treatment of patients with compromised general health. The last part of the course will be solely devoted to the presentation/discussion of complex cases. (Department of Comprehensive Dentistry)
  
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    DENT 4112 - DENTAL GRAND ROUNDS IV

    [14 Credits]
    The class will be held by team leaders, clinical science faculty and basic science faulty to increase vertical integration and critical thinking in the dental education. Students will be expected to present interesting cases of paients to include, photographs, x-rays, diagnostic casts, proposed and alternative treatment plans to selected faculty and peers. In addition, students must defend their proposed treatment options using evidence based learning from peer reviewed journals. At the conclusion of this class, fourth-year students will have developed a portfolio of documented cases to use for futhering their education after graduation.
  
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    DENT 4113 - SENIOR ENDODONTIC CLINIC

    [26 Credits]
    In the patient care clinic, all students will treat pulpally involved anterior and bicuspid teeth. Grades for this course are a culmination of all endodontic procedures performed from the third year snd and fourth year clinical experiences.
  
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    DENT 4114 - PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY CLINIC II

    [56 Credits]
    This course provides controlled clinical experiences to teach the fourth-year student basic diagnostic and technical skills needed to provide comprehensive dental examinations and treatment along with oral health guidelines for the child patient. This course builds on the experience gained from the third-year Pediatric Dentistry Clinic course. Rotation to the Special Children’s Dental Clinic at Children’s Hospital concludes in the first semester of this course. . (Department of Pediatric Dentistry)
  
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    DENT 4115 - CLINICAL PROSTHODONTICS II

    [270 Credits]
    In this course, the student will learn to diagnose and to increase proficiency in the design, fabrication, and follow-up care of complete dentures, removable partial dentures, immediate denture, and overdentures. Students will also be required to complete or assist the fabrication of an implant retained full denture or partial denture. Through clinical experience, the student will apply the knowledge and skills gained in the prosthodontics preclinical course. Patient treatment and understanding allow the student to learn how to earn patient trust and cooperation. Successful completion of the Removable Prosthodontic Competency Examination is required by the last day of this course. This course will also allow the student to gain clinical experience in the discipline of fixed prosthodontics. The student will treat patients requiring single crowns and fixed partial dentures that restore natural teeth and implant (s). Additionally, students will also be required to complete or assist the restoration of an implant with a crown. Patient treatment will allow the student to apply the knowledge and skills gained in the preclinical courses while the student is closely supervised in a clinical setting. The role of fixed prosthodontics, as it relates to other disciplines and total patient care, will be emphasized through detailed treatment plans that encompass all aspects of restorative dentistry. Close cooperation with the removable clinical course is required to facilitate the construction of removable-partial-denture abutment crowns.
  
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    DENT 4131 - ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

    [30 Credits]
    Students will participate in staff OMS cases at clinic, private hospital, and rounds for one-week period.
  
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    DENT 4132 - ORAL HISTOPATHOLOGY

    [20 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the histological features of oral diseases and to correlate these features with the clinical presentation. This course should be especially useful for students contemplating entering a surgical specialty of dentistry (oral surgery, periodontics, and endodontics). Evaluation: Attendance and meaningful oral participation.
  
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    DENT 4135 - ADVANCED ENDODONTICS

    [36 Credits]
    Course is to enhance endodontics skills and expand the scope of treatment skills. Students will receive training in more challenging situations including molar therapy, retreatment, difficult access preparation, and optional obturation methods including warm vertical condensation Obtura, Guttaflow, Thermafil and Ultrafil Trifecta. The Endodontic Clinic has been modernized and has the “state of the art” equipment. Undergraduate students should be exposed to the newer concepts of endodontic therapy.
  
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    DENT 4139 - TEACHING SELECTIVE

    [1-99 Credits]
    he teaching selective experience is intended for dental students who have an interest in a career in dental education. Students gain practical experience working with course directors serving as faculty mentors to teach in the basic science, preclinical or clinical science courses taught to dental, dental hygiene and/or dental laboratory technology students. Faculty mentors introduce the students to various techniques used to educate professional students. To enroll in this program, the students must contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, who will work with the student to identify appropriate departments and mentors. The student then must submit a proposal identifying: the faculty mentor(s) he/she will work with; the course(s) he/she will be involved with and the estimated number of hours of credit being sought. The faculty mentor will confirm the proposal and will determine how many clock hours the student is awarded based on work completed This proposal must be approved by the faculty mentor(s), appropriate department head(s) and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs prior to enrollment in the selective. Teaching credit will be given for course/lecture/tutoring/program preparation as well as for the time spent delivering the prepared material.
  
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    DENT 4142 - ORAL SURGERY IMPLANT OBSERVATION

    [32 Credits]
    Students will observe patients being treated in various stages of implant treatment. Students will also be introduced to training using the iCAT and other methods to treatment plan multiple type cases.
  
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    DENT 4143 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN DENTAL RESEARCH

    [16 Credits]
    The focus of this course is to explore and discuss emerging topics within dental research. The class will be taught by both basic science and clinical faculty as topics and expertise will involve Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Comprehensive Dentistry and Biomaterials, Prosthodontics, Periodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Endodontics and Oral Medicine. Each lecture period will consist of students presenting a primary research article over a topic of his or her choice. The student will be expected to give relevant background necessary to the paper, and present the article in a thorough, scholarly manner to both students, clinical and research faculty ( who will be asked to participate based on faculty expertise to the topic at hand). The topic will be discussed and critiqued throughout this process as a means to dissect the paper’s relevance, strength and weaknesses and applicability to dentistry.
  
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    DENT 4145 - SENIOR PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY

    [32 Credits]
    This course consists of a week-long rotation through the LSU Pediatric Dentistry Clinic and the LSU Dental Clinic at Children’s Hospital and the New Orleans Adolescent Hospital. The rotation contains a mix of patient care and observation as well as participating in seminars. Students may elect to register for two weeks if space permits.
  
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    DENT 4152 - CURRENT TOPICS IN DENTAL RESEARCH

    [1 Credit]
    This course is designed for students to examine current topics in dental reserach involving the disciplines of Oral and Craniofacial Biology, Comprehensive Dentistry and Biomaterials, Prosthodontics, Periodontics, Pediatric Dentistry, Endodontics, or Oral Medicine. Students will be expected to interpret the literature to dissect the paper’s relevance, strength and weakness and applicability to dentistry.
  
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    DENT 4153 - FORENSIC ODONTOLOGY

    [10 Credits]
    This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic concepts of forensic dentistry including general forensic concepts and history, dental identification, mass fatality identification and protocols, bite marks and pattern injuries analysis, child abuse, civil litigation, and introduction to court testimony.
  
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    DENT 4160 - Honors in Teaching Program

    [1-100 Credits]
    The Honors in Teaching Program is an elective program for students who have a definite interest in gaining practical experience in dental education and have a desire to participate in dental education in the future. The students enrolled in this program will have the opportunity to prepare instructional material, tutor and/or provide instruction to dental and dental hygiene or dental laboratory technology students. Depending on their area of interest, students will be given the opportunity to provide instruction in the basic science, preclinical and, in some cases, clinical courses. In order to prepare for their teaching experiences, students will gain knowledge in instructional techniques used by faculty of the School of Dentistry to educate professional students. To enroll in this program, the students must contact the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, who will work with the student to identify appropriate departments and mentors. Students will be evaluated by the selected mentors and the course director on a ‘pass’ (successful) or ‘fail’ (unsuccessful) basis. Successful completion of 150 clock hours of “teaching” credit is required in order to earn the designation of “Honors in Teaching” on the student’s LSUHSC transcript. Teaching credit will be determined by the course director and the mentor. Teaching credit will be given for course/ lecture/tutoring/program preparation as well as for the time spent delivering the prepared material.
  
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    DENT 4162 - LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT SENIOR SELECTIVE

    [6 Credits]
    This Senior Selective will expose students to the basics and selected dental terminology of the following languages: Spanish, French, Vietnamese, and American Sign Language.
  
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    DENT 4180 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN DENTISTRY

    [100-200 Credits]
    Lecture/laboratory/preclinic/clinic time distribution to be independently arranged for each course as appropriate. This course offers the student an opportunity to gain additional exposure to specific subject matter covered in the required courses. Enrollment in this course required written consent by the course director.
  
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    DENT 4181 - Interdisciplinary Management of Dental Trauma

    [19 Credits]
    This course is intended to be an introduction to dental trauma management across the specialties. Students will participate in case based learning discussion sessions and lectures at the beginning of the course to introduce them to principles of management of traumatic injuries. Following this didactic portion, the students will shadow pediatric dentistry residents on call for one week and oral surgery residents. Students are required to attend the OMFS conference on the week proceeding and following their shadowing rotation. Students will be encouraged to attend follow-up endodontic appointments when possible. Students will generate a brief emergency summary with no identifying patient information to circulate to classmates and faculty following observed trauma cases on call. The course will end with a final group session to reflect on the experiences observed.
  
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    DENT 5510 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN ORAL BIOLOGY AND DENTISTRY

    [1-5 Credits]
    This is a comprehensive course addressing advanced topics in oral biology and dentistry. Topics include: (1) immunology; (2) molecular biology; (3) research methodology; (4) statistics; (5) oral medicine; (6) TMJ and oral pain; (7) pulpal and periodontal biology; (8) diagnosis of oral lesions; (9) radiology; (10) dental materials and other current advanced topics. This course presents topics relevant to the clinical practice of dental specialists. Recent advances in basic sciences, and clinical dentistry will be highlighted throughout the course. The course begins in the summer semester and continues through the fall and spring semesters.
  
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    DENT 5511 - OROFACIAL PAIN

    [2 Credits]
    This course is intended to provide the graduate dental student with a current overview of Comprehensive Pain Management emphasizing the orofacial region. This course is intended to update and expand the graduate dental students’ understanding and knowledge of current concepts in Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology, Neurology (as it relates to the trigeminal system), Orofacial Pain, Pharmacology and Temporomandibular Disorders and also in the management of various conditions related to these topics.
  
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    DENT 5512 - INTERDISCIPLINARY SPECIAL TOPICS IN DENTISTRY

    [2 Credits]
    This course introduces the Advanced Education student to multiple interdisciplinary topics through clinical, practice management, and research presentations. The course consists of four all day programs with presentations by guest lecturers, faculty, and Advanced Education students. Two all day programs will focus on clinical cases and problems emphasizing interdisciplinary approaches to treatment. A third all day program will address practice management issues and solutions. The fourth program will provide Advanced Education students an opportunity to present their research to all Advanced Education students and faculty.
  
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    DENT 9999 - EXAMINATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]

Dermatology

  
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    DERM 420 - DERMATOLOGY CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    This course is designed for 4th year students and is an in depth rotation with clinics, didactics, and exposure to various dermatologic procedures and subspecialties.
  
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    DERM 498 - DERMATOLOGY RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    DERM 498A - FREE PLANNED ELECTIVE/RESEARCH
  
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    DERM 499 - DERMATOLOGY OUT-STATE ELEC

    [152 Hours]
    This elective is the same as DERM 420  at LSUHSC

Elective

  
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    ELEC 1000 - FREE ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
  
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    ELEC 1100 - GENERAL ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
  
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    ELEC 1200 - ART ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]

Endodontics

  
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    ENDO 5102 - TEACHING UNERGRAD SEMINAR & LABS

    [3 Credits]
    Teaching allows consolidation of knowledge by requiring instant analysis and judgment in guiding pre-doctoral students in developing skills in preclinical procedures. All students must teach the Preclinical Endodontics Laboratory Course to the sophomore dental students in the Spring Semester of each year. First Year students must also attend all lectures. This course consists of 10 all-day sessions: approximately half of the time is lectures, seminars and demonstrations while the other half is devoted to the development of skills using laboratory exercises.
  
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    ENDO 5103 - TOPICAL LITERATURE REVIEW

    [3-4 Credits]
    The main purpose of this course is to aid the students in the development of an endodontic philosophy based on available research evidence. The students will also develop skill in the evaluation and interpretation of scientific articles. The students use this philosophy in the selection of procedures performed in the clinic. The dental literature offers the most accessible means for the practitioner to develop a philosophy and to update knowledge and skills. This course uses articles from the dental literature to present classical and current philosophies in selected subject areas. Development of skills in evaluating the literature encourages the student to continue this practice throughout his dental career. The knowledge and skills gained will serve the student well in all clinical procedures and in the successful completion of American Board of Endodontic examinations. Approximately 160 hours are scheduled for the presentation of this course. Classes meet for approximately 45 sessions of 3 1/2 hours each. Approximately 25-30 articles will be covered in each of the 40 topical sessions.
  
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    ENDO 5104 - CLINICAL ENDODONTIC SEMINAR

    [1-2 Credits]
    The purpose of this seminar is to provide a forum in which clinical experiences can be shared and in which discussion of clinical cases presented will benefit not only the presenter, but all in attendance. Student and faculty presentations of clinical cases will serve as the basis for discussions of diagnosis and treatment philosophies. Individual evaluation of student clinical performance with constructive criticism is also provided. Approximately 80 hours are scheduled for this course on a yearly basis. Seminars meet for 3-hour sessions. Other seminars with guest clinicians are usually added as they are arranged.
  
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    ENDO 5105 - ENDODONTIC JOURNAL CLUB

    [1-2 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to review the current literature for articles pertaining to endodontics. The articles reviewed are evaluated for placement in the Endodontic Literature Review. This allows the student to consider new ideas or information in relationship to classical and current endodontic philosophy. Updating the literature review course is extremely important if one is to keep up with the latest changes in endodontics. The process of reviewing and abstracting the current articles serves as a means of using the skills gained during literature review for comparing and analyzing recent work. There are 14 sessions, each 3 and 1/2 hours. During each session, each article reviewed will be evaluated for the following characteristics: 1) experimental design, materials and methods, and statistical evaluation; 2) reliability and validity of results; 3) relationship of results and conclusion; and 4) value to the literature topic, especially compared to articles already included in respective Literature Review Session.
  
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    ENDO 5106 - CLINICAL ENDODONTICS

    [2-11 Credits]
    lude the complete scope of endodontic practice. Medically compromised patients, as well as healthy patients, are treated under appropriate supervision. The range of treatment includes emergency and diagnostic treatment; conservative and surgical therapy; vital and non-vital bleaching procedures; implants, replants, and root-extrusion techniques. A minimum of 300 clinical cases must be completed. These cases must demonstrate a clinically acceptable result. There must be a variety of treatment modalities. Cases are reviewed with all students monthly during Clinical Seminar. Grades are determined by the students’ progress in developing stated competencies and proficiencies and by progress toward completion of the required minimum number of cases.
  
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    ENDO 5107 - ENDODONTIC RESEARCH

    [1-2 Credits]
    An original laboratory, animal, or clinical research project must be completed during the 24-month program. This research must result in the production of a publishable manuscript. The results must also be presented in an oral presentation at LSUSD, or in any presentation format at a national meeting (AAE, IADR, etc.). Grades are determined by the students’ timely progress in completing the following research activities (appropriate to the research topic): 1) Formulate a research activity, 2) submit a written proposal, in proper format, to the LSUSD Student Research Committee, 3) revision and amendment of the proposal as necessary to receive approval and funding, 4) submit the proposal to the AAE Foundation for funding, 5) obtain Institutional Animal Care and Utilization Committee approval for studies using animal models, or Institutional Review Board approval for studies using human subjects, 6) conduct the research, 7) analyze the results, and 8) present the results in an oral presentation.
  
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    ENDO 5405 - BASIC ENDODONTIC REVIEW

    [4 Credits]
    This course is designed to review current philosophies and techniques of endodontic practice as presented in current textbooks, in order to give the students the opportunity to demonstrate their current endodontic clinical skills, and to allow the students the opportunity to modify their philosophies and techniques and improve their skills. This course consists of 62 hours in 9 all-day sessions: 16.5 hours of didactic seminars, 42.5 hours of laboratory instruction, reviews, and exercises, and 3 hours of postgrad clinical case review seminar. The seminar sessions consist of a guided discussion of textbook reading assignments. The laboratory sessions guide the students through a self-assessment of their current endodontic techniques and introduce the student to experiences with new materials and techniques. The clinical case review seminar introduces the student to management of complex clinical cases.
  
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    ENDO 5406 - TEACHING UNDERGRADUATE CLINIC

    [1-2 Credits]
    Teaching allows consolidation of knowledge by requiring instant analysis and judgment in guiding pre-doctoral students in reviewing knowledge and rationale and in developing skills in clinical procedures. Second Year students must teach in the Junior Endodontic Clinic and in the Advanced Endodontic Elective Clinic for Seniors. The schedule for this assigned teaching responsibility is included in the Endodontic Postgraduate Schedule. Second Year students also participate in the teaching responsibilities of the Endodontic Department by consultation with students or faculty in other departments. This is done on a time-available basis, depending on student and faculty schedules.
  
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    ENDO 9999 - EXAMINIATION ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    EXAMINATION ONLY

Environmental Health

  
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    ENHS 6238 - PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    This course explores the relationships between man and the natural environment by examining the impact of human activities on air, water, soil, and food quality, and by analyzing the outcomes of encounters between humans and natural events, venomous animals, and toxic plants and fungi.
  
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    ENHS 6239 - PRINCIPLES OF OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this ENHS curriculum core curriculum course is (1) to provide public health practitioners and managers with an overview of occupational health and related medical issues, (2) to link occupational hazards and exposures with the pathophysiologic development of occupationally-related illnesses, and (3) to fulfill the Occupational Health and Medicine course requirements.
  
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    ENHS 6240 - TRAVELER’S HEALTH AND TROPICAL MEDICINE

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is (1) to provide an overview of traveler’s health and related travel and tropical medical issues, and (2) to link foreign travel and tropical and other environmental exposures with the pathophysiologic development of travel and environmentally related illnesses. This course is not a laboratory course and does not duplicate the didactic and laboratory material presented in Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology (MIP). This course emphasizes the etiologic agents, clinical manifestations, medical and surgical management, and primary and secondary prevention of travel-acquired and tropical diseases.
  
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    ENHS 6241 - MEDICAL TOXICOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is (1) to provide public health, medical, and health sciences graduate students with an introduction to medical toxicology and related medical issues; (2) to link illicit, prescribed, and OTC pharmaceutical poisonings with the pathophysiologic development of drug induced illnesses, (3) to link occupational, environmental, and wilderness hazards and exposures with the patholophysiologic development of organic toxin-induced illnesses; (4) to develop methodologies for the primary prevention, diagnosis and treatment of common poisonings in children and adults; and (5) to prepare medical students for the USMLE Parts 2 and 3, specifically to prepare for questions regarding common poisonings and envenomations in children and adults.
  
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    ENHS 6243 - AIR QUALITY, AIR POLLUTION AND DISPERSION MODELING

    [3 Credits]
    This course will consider the common biological, chemical, and physiochemical contaminants of indoor and outdoor air in relationship to national air quality standards and recommended maximum exposure levels. In addition, this course will introduce the application of computer modeling in predicting the directions, configurations, maximum contaminant levels, and human effects of intentional and unintentional vapor plume releases. Designs for gaseous pollutant and particulate control are discussed.
  
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    ENHS 6245 - HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides students with the knowledge and methodology to determine whether current or future chemical exposures will pose health risk to certain population or ecosystems. The objectives of this course are (1) to provide the concept of environmental health risk assessment, (2) to understand the basic components of risk assessment, (3) to understand the methods for risk analysis and management, (4) to familiarize with different toxicological databases and resources (5) to familiarize with the regulatory aspect of risk assessment (6) to provide the skills of effective risk communication.
  
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    ENHS 6246 - WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is (1) to provide an overview of principle of water quality management , (2) to familiarize with water quality law and regulation, (3) to familiarize with water sources/usage and water quality characteristics, (4) to identify water pollution parameters, (5) to examine the available treatments, (6) and to understand the importance of water quality monitoring and protection.
  
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    ENHS 6247 - PREVENTION & MANAGEMENT OF FOODBORNE DISEASES

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of (1) food borne diseases and their etiologies, (2) factors that favor and deter microbial growth in foods, (3) characteristics of food borne disease outbreak (4) emerging pathogens related to food borne disease, and (5) federal and state responsibilities in control of food borne disease.
  
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    ENHS 6249 - OCCUPATIONAL LUNG DISEASES

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide Public Health professionals with a solid understanding of: (1) How occupational and environmental exposures can cause pulmonary disease; (2) How respiratory protection can be employed to prevent occupational pulmonary disease; (3) How physicians assess a worker for possible lung disease; (4) Clinical presentation, diagnosis, and prognosis of common occupational pulmonary diseases.
  
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    ENHS 6250 - EMERGENCY RESPONSE TO DISASTERS & TERRIORISM

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide public health students with an overview and awareness of potential threats facing our homeland and to familiarize students with the protocols for response for Public Health employees and for the local, state, and federal agencies associated with response and recovery. Emergency response is multi-faceted and this course will include observation as well as practical experiences in the field.
  
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    ENHS 6251 - RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RADIATION SAFETY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides a basic review of nuclear physics and considers the common environmental sources of natural and manmade ionizing radiation and the human health impact of ionizing radiation. Radiation protection of workers and the general public are discussed.
  
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    ENHS 6252 - INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY

    [3 Credits]
    This course considers the principles of industrial hygiene including skin and lung absorption, dermal and inhalation toxicology, biohazards, ergonomics, chemical agents, and indoor heating/cooling and ventilation systems. In addition, this course teaches the principles of industrial plant safety including job safety analysis, job re-design, hazard indentification, biomarker monitoring, emergency operations, and the socio-behavioral aspects of safety compliance.
  
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    ENHS 6253 - GEOSPATIAL HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of the ENHS public health course entitled Geospatial Health and Environment is (1) to provide health, medical, and health sciences graduate students with an introduction to medical applications of the geospatial sciences and related environmental issues; (2) to link new tools in Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing (GIS/RS) to environmental and geospatial risk factors that determine the spatial distribution and prevalence of disease, (3) understand the fundamental concepts of landscape epidemiology and the basis for ecological niche modeling of disease agents, (4) develop technical skills needed for application of GIS/RS decision support systems in prevention, control and health education programs, and (5) integrate course concepts and skills by development and presentation of a class project that applying GIS/RS to a disease issue of public health importance.
  
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    ENHS 6254 - ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    This course is intended for MPH students who lack a background in environmental public health policy. Students will gain knowledge of how environmental health policies are developed, the statues that have evolved to address public health concerns about specific environmental hazards, and the policy issues that impact how environmental health programs function within governmental structures. Special topics will include international environmental health programs, and the policy impacts of environmental equity/justice and risk assessment. Outcomes of the course include knowledge of the following: 1) the structure and functions of the United States environmental public health system; 2) environmental public health statutes, and 3) environmental public health policy impacts.
  
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    ENHS 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student an opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the Course will be a specific aspect of a public health discipline which is not the primary focus of existing public health courses. The Course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours toward the MPH Degree
  
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    ENHS 6500 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH SCIENCES

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course is designed, depending on the student’s interest and faculty availability, to cover advanced topics in areas such as “Food safety”, “Air quality”, “Water quality”, “Soil quality”, “Occupational health”, “Industrial hygiene”, “Waste management”, and “Environmental justice.” The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic.
  
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    ENHS 6600 - CULMINATING EXPERIENCE IN ENVIRONMENTAL & OCCUPATIONAL HLTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    Students will synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in case studies that approximates an aspect of public health practice in behavioral and community health sciences. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100 or 6200; EPID 6210; ENHS 6238: BCHS 6212; HPSM 6268. By permission of instructor only.

Epidemiology

  
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    EPID 6210 - PRINCIPLES OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides an introduction to epidemiology as a basic science for public health and clinical medicine. It will address the principles of the quantitative approach to public health and clinical problems. The course will discuss measures of frequency and association, introduce the design and validity of epidemiologic research, and give an overview of data analysis. This course is an introduction to the skills needed by public health professionals to interpret critically the epidemiologic literature. It will provide students with principles and practical experience needed to initiate the development of these skills. Lectures are complemented by seminars devoted to case studies, exercises, or critique of current examples of epidemiologic studies.
  
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    EPID 6211 - INTERMEDIATE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides an integrated coverage of the principles of epidemiologic design, analysis, and interpretation at an intermediate level, suitable for epidemiologists and other public health professionals interested in a more thorough understanding of these concepts. Prerequisite: EPID 6210, BIOS 6100 and Pre- or Corequisite: BIOS 6102 or equivalent.
  
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    EPID 6213 - EPIDEMILOGY SEMINAR

    [1 Credit]
    This seminar series provides exposure to current research and special topics of interest in epidemiology. Prerequisite: EPID 6210.
  
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    EPID 6214 - INFECTIOUS DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This introductory course provides an overview of infectious disease epidemiology. It is a companion course to Chronic Disease Epidemiology (EPID 6223). The course addresses the most important groups of infectious diseases, including respiratory and enteric infections, Tuberculosis, Hepatitis and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. It focuses on the biological basis, incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality of infectious diseases. Prerequisite EPID 6210.
  
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    EPID 6216 - BIOLOGICAL BASIS OF HEALTH

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed to provide a background in the biologic basis of disease for MPH students who do not have a background in health sciences. The course will focus on the most salient topics and diseases. Prerequisite: None.
  
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    EPID 6217 - DATABASE MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides students with the basic skills to design good relational databases, hands-on experience in creating and managing databases using Microsoft Access, and sources of information for the construction of databases in public health. Prerequisite: EPID 6210, and BIOS 6100.
  
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    EPID 6218 - SPATIAL ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course introduces students to a range of geospatial analyses uses and methods. Students will apply problem solving abilities, critical thinking skills, and creative thinking to diverse examples of medical geography and spatial epidemiology. Content will focus on teaching methods and interpretation of spatial analysis. Non content objectives are for students to develop a critical and creative approach to questions which can benefit from spatial epidemiology. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100.
  
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    EPID 6219 - NUTRITIONAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is an introduction to the methodological issues related to the design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation of studies investigating the relationship between nutritional status, diet, and disease. An emphasis will be placed on the types of dietary and nutritional status assessment methods and their advantages and disadvantages in epidemiologic research. Students will gain a practical experience in the actual collection, analysis, and interpretation of dietary intake. The interpretation of studies in nutritional epidemiology given the dietary instrument used and the study design will be considered. Issues such as intra- and inter-individual variation, measurement error, misclassification, homogeneity of intake within populations, and correlations among nutrients, micronutrients, and food groups will be discussed. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100.
  
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    EPID 6220 - MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course covers the theoretical concepts and practical issues involved in conducting research involving molecular biomarkers in human populations. Class topics include the theoretical advantages of biomarkers, criteria for evaluating potential markers, sample collection and storage, laboratory quality control considerations, issues in epidemiologic study design and analysis, ethical/legal concerns, and discussion of specific examples of research involving molecular markers of internal dose, susceptibility, early pathological alteration, and prognosis. The course will emphasize examples from the cancer research literature. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100
  
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    EPID 6222 - CANCER EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides students with an understanding of the theory of carcinogenesis and major etiologic factors for cancer, including tobacco, diet and nutrition, alcohol, viruses and bacteria, drugs, occupation, and radiation. The epidemiology of major cancer sites i.e. lung, breast, prostate, colon and rectum, cervix and uterine corpus, and selected cancers of specific interest to the class will also be presented. Study design and methodology used in cancer research are discussed throughout the course. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100.
  
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    EPID 6223 - CHRONIC DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This introductory course provides an overview of chronic disease epidemilogy and prevention strategies. It is a companion course to Infectious Disease Epidemiology (EPID 6214). The course addresses the most important groups of chronic diseases, including heart disease, stroke, hypertension, cancer, diabetes, lung diseases and neurologic diseases. It focuses on the biological basis, incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality of chronic diseases as well as etiologic factors accounting for differences in incidence and mortality. Students will learn how to apply epidemiologic methods for chronic disease prevention and control studies and understand the importance of surveillance and applied research as a base for public health interventions. Prerequisite: EIPD 6210.
  
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    EPID 6226 - EPIDEMIOLOGIC DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    The course is designed to integrate and apply concepts learned in previous biostatistics and epidemiologic methods courses as they relate to epidemiologic studies. The conceptual basis for the design, conduct, and analysis of observational and experimental studies will be covered, focusing on providing students with data analysis, interpretation, and presentation skills. Students will gain hands-on experience in designing and analyzing studies through classroom sessions and homework assignments. Prerequisites: EPDI 6210, EPID 6211, BIOS 6100 and BIOS 6102.
  
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    EPID 6228 - SURVEY DESIGN

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to survey methodology. It introduces students to a set of principles of survey design that are the basis of standard practices in the field. The course exposes students to research literature that uses both observational and experimental methods to test key hypotheses about the nature of human behavior that affect the quality of survey data. The course will also present import statistical concepts and techniques in sample design, execution, and estimation, as well as models of behavior describing errors in responding to survey questions. Thus, both social science and statistical concepts will be presented. This course will be taught through lectures, readings, group discussion. When taken in conjunction with BIOS 6312 (Sampling Methods) and BCHS 7221 (Structural Equation Modeling and Psychometrics), this course offers students comprehensive training in Survey Methods. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100.
  
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    EPID 6301 - EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS AND DISEASES

    [3 Credits]
    Designed for doctoral and master’s degree students, this course covers the theories and methodologies related to the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Students will gain an understanding of important issues in the epidemiology of HIV and STIs in the US and internationally, and will increase their understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of various epidemiologic study designs and the interpretation of data. Also addressed will be implications for transmission, prevention, and the psychosocial, behavioral, and economic aspects of STIs, particularly HIV. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and BIOS 6100
  
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    EPID 6350 - EPIDEMIOLOGY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH PRACTICE

    [3 Credits]
    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the roles and responsibilities of MPH-trained public health professionals in public health practice. Lectures will be based on principal public health service areas, such as the surveillance of infectious diseases, disease and cluster investigations, maternal and child health, environmental epidemiology, oral health and health communication. Availability and use of different data sources, data collections systems, data quality measures as well as data analysis and reports/publications will illustrate the role of epidemiology, in public health practice. Furthermore, federal and state reporting requirements, funding sources and program evaluations will be also discussed. Public health practitioners from different program areas are invited guest speakers who will give an overview and demonstrate specific public health program with emphasis of the implementation of epidemiology concepts which serves as the cornerstone for every public health practitioner.
  
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    EPID 6351 - PUBLIC HEALTH SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM THEORY AND METHODS

    [2 Credits]
    The goal of this course is to make the students aware of all aspects that must be considered when designing or working with a Public Health Surveillance System (PHSS). The lectures will concentrate on the different types of PHSS, database structures, practical design elements, data gathering strategies, quality control and evaluation considerations and the role of PHSS within the public health community. Additionally, students will be given the opportunity to utilize their analytical skills and demonstrate their mastery of statistical software packages by performing preliminary analysis of a real PHSS data set. Prerequisite: EPID 6210
  
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    EPID 6352 - SOCIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course will provide students with a systematic and selective overview of the conceptual approaches necessary to investigate the impact of social context on the health of populations. Among the social processes to be examined are social inequalities (including social class differences as well as the effects of income inequality per se), social capital and social cohesion, social networks and neighborhood characteristics. The course will include discussion of methods related to the study of social factors across multiple levels. The course will be taught as a seminar. Some analytic writing will be required. Previous exposure to social science methods and theory is advised, but not required. Prerequisite: EPID 6211
  
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    EPID 6362 - ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    Applies epidemiological design and analysis issues specific to environmental and occupational health. Students review and critique a number of published articles to illustrate the application of epidemiological principles to the study of exposures occurring in the workplace and in the general environment.
  
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    EPID 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student an opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific aspect of a public health discipline which is not the primary focus of existing public health course. The course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours towards the MPH Degree.
  
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    EPID 6500 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course is designed, depending upon student’s interest and faculty availability, to cover a specific advanced topic such as cancer surveillance or applied analysis of population-based data. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic. Students may registrar for more than one Special Topic in the same semester.
  
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    EPID 6600 - CULMINATING EXPERIENCE IN EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Students will synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in case studies that approximates an aspect of public health practice in behavioral and community health sciences. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100 or 6200; EPID 6210; ENHS 6238: BCHS 6212; HPSM 6268. By permission of instructor only.
  
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    EPID 7200 - ADVANCED EPIDEMIOLOGIC METHODS I

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed for students in the epidemiology PhD program who already have a solid grounding in epidemiology. This course is part one of a two course series in advanced methods in epidemiology. This course builds upon the concepts and methods acquired in Principles of Epidemiology (EPID 6210), Intermediate Epidemiology (EPID 6211), and Epidemiologic Design and Analysis (EPID 6226). It provides an integrated overview and specific applied experience in areas not covered in these courses as well as more in-depth coverage of key areas critical to the transition from masters to doctoral level research. Students will gain knowledge in identifying complex methodological problems in epidemiologic research (e.g., missing data, information bias, confounding bias, selection bias, multiple exposures, and multilevel determinants of disease), state implications for etiologic inference, and apply appropriate analytic tool(s) to diagnose and account for the complex methodological problems. Prerequisites: EPID 6226 and BIOS 6210
  
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    EPID 7201 - ADVANCED EPIDEMIOLOGIC METHODS II

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed for students in the epidemiology PhD program who already have a solid grounding in epidemiology and have experience in advance epidemiologic methods. This course builds upon the concepts and methods acquired in EPID 6210, EPID 6211, EPID 6226, and EPID 7200. It provides an integrated overview and specific applied experience in areas not covered in these courses as well as more in-depth coverage of key areas critical to doctoral level research. Students will gain knowledge in identifying complex methodological problems in different areas of epidemiologic research including common methods across the different epidemiology concentrations (e.g., Clinical Epidemiology, Pharmacoepidemiology, and Surveillance Epidemiology) as well at those methods unique to the individual areas of epidemiology. Student will increase their knowledge and experience with accounting for missing data, multiple exposures, and multilevel determinants of disease. The prerequisites for enrollment is EPID 7200 or instructor permission.
  
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    EPID 7202 - GRANTSMANSHIP AND PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EPIDEMIOLOGIC RESEARCH

    [3 Credits]
    This course covers the fundamental knowledge and skills necessary for effective proposal development and grant writing. Included are sources of grant opportunities and funding and how to find them as well as identification of appropriate study questions and approaches for a given grant or funding target. Development and articulation of effective background documentation, rationale, research design, budgeting and budget justification and IRB process will be covered in the context of the mechanics of the grant submission process, including the key elements that reviewers use in evaluating a grant. As part of the course, students will develop a research question and prepare a grant application and budget, addressing the selected topic including the relevant IRB and HIPAA documents.
  
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    EPID 7214 - ADVANCED INFECTIOUS DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    The goal of this course is a conceptual framework for understanding endemic and epidemic patterns of infectious diseases. Students will learn about the differences in transmission models and will be introduced to infectious disease modeling for selected infectious diseases of Public Health importance. Furthermore, the students will gain insights on how to quantitatively assess the effects on endemic infection levels by understanding the biology of infection, risk factors and transmission dynamics. Selected studies will be used to apply infectious disease modeling in outbreak situations and vaccine efficacy field trails as well as to model the effectiveness of interventions when real data are sparse. Prerequisites: EPID 6210 and EPID 6214
  
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    EPID 7350 - EVOLUTION OF EPIDEMIOLOGIC THEORY AND METHODS

    [2 Credits]
    This course will examine the development of modern epidemiological concepts from the 19th to the 21st century. The course will utilize weekly readings and discussions of original key papers. Emphasis will be placed on exploring the links between epidemiological methods, concepts of disease and public health practice. Prerequisites: EPID 6226 and BIOS 6102
  
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    EPID 7400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY (DOCTORAL)

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course provides a doctoral student an opportunity to study an advanced topic in depth while under the guidance of a faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific methodological or substantive topic in epidemiology. The course will involve directed readings or hands-on research and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studies. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic. Students may register for more than one specific Independent Study courses in a given semester.
  
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    EPID 7410 - TEACHING PRACTICUM IN EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course will provide doctoral students in epidemiology with supervised teaching experience to develop their teaching skills. This experience will come primarily from serving in the role of teaching assistants for epidemiology courses. Developmental workshops and materials offered by the LSU Health Sciences Center’s Academy for the Advancement of Educational Scholarship and other resources will be incorporated as part of the training experience. Prerequisite: EPID 6226
  
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    EPID 7500 - ADVANCED TOPICS IN EPIDEMIOLOGY

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course is designed to address advanced topics in epidemology at the doctoral level beyond what is currently addressed in existing courses, such as advanced methods in cancer or molecular epidemiology. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic. Students may register for more than one specific Advanced Topic in the same semester.
  
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    EPID 7700 - EPIDEMIOLOGY JOURNAL CLUB

    [1 Credit]
    This seminar series provides exposure to current research and special topics of interest in epidemiology. Doctoral students participating for credit will be expected to lead at least one session. Prerequisite: EPID 6210
  
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    EPID 7800 - PROSPECTUS DEVELOPMENT

    [1-9 Credits]
    Research-related work for PhD degree students prior to passing Oral Prospectus. The credit hours from this course cannot count toward the elective hours required for completion of the PhD Degree.
  
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    EPID 7900 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    For PhD candidates who are conducting research for their dissertation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the oral qualifying exam.

Family Medicine

  
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    FMMD 210 - NUTRITION AND HEALTH

    [40 Hours]
    The Nutrition and Health elective consists of team based learning (TBL) sessions and modules on various aspects of nutrition (including diets, nutrition for disease states, and nutrition for age groups). In addition, the course includes at least one team project related to nutrition in the community, such as a healthy food demonstration, or participation in a community garden. Students must participate in all activities and pass all modules and TBL.
  
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    FMMD 220 - INTERPROFESSIONAL CARE MANAGEMENT

    [40 Hours]
    The Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practicum will incorporate the concepts of practice in a patient centered medical home. These concepts have been established in the Joint Principles for the Medical Education of Physicians as Preparation for Practice in the PCMH which was published by the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Physicians, and the American Osteopathic Association. The goals of this practicum are 1) to engage interprofessional learners in management of high risk patients (diabetics); 2) to learn interprofessional teamwork focused on meeting target indicators for this population; 3) to promote patient self-management of their chronic condition; 4) to introduce activities in practice and learning that result in practice improvement. Practicum experiences will include team meetings to discuss and monitor the progress of selected patients from the diabetes registry and to practice improvement projects.
  
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    FMMD 300 - FAMILY MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    This required clerkship provides third-year students with an introduction to the principles of Family Medicine as practiced in a community-based ambulatory setting or in a residency program. The student is assigned to a clinical faculty member (also known as a preceptor) within the State and may live in that community. He or she spends most of the four weeks working directly in office-based patient care under the supervision of the preceptor. During this rotation, the student has the opportunity to see patients of all ages as they present with any of the broad range of medical problems seen by family physicians. It is primarily in the outpatient setting, therefore, the type of medical problems that students will see and the dynamics of healthcare delivery will be different. The patients will come with common problems, chronic problems, and undifferentiated problems.
  
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    FMMD 310 - GLOBAL HEALTH AND SOCIAL MEDICINE 300 (PASS/FAIL)

    [76 Hours]
    The Global Health and Social Medicine course offers an introduction to health issues on a global scale and their complex relationship to biosocial contexts. Students will explore the relationship of global health issues to family medicine, primary care, and healthcare systems as a whole. The course will provide students with additional education in several areas including tropical disease, global health disparities, global health policy, and risk/benefit analysis of global health interventions. The impact of these issues on the U.S. healthcare system will also be explored. The Global Health and Social Medicine course will employe multiple educational modalities, including pre-course reading requirements, online modules, traditional didactics, and hands on clinical experience under the direct supervision of experience physicians in an international setting. The international setting will also include interaction with in-country ministry of health regional healthcare stakeholders, and direct supervision of clinical activities consistent with the breadth of traditional family medicine (adult medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and geriatrics).
  
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    FMMD 410 - GLOBAL HEALTH AND SOCIAL MEDICINE 400

    [152 Hours]
    The Global Health and Social Medicine course offers an introduction to health issues on a global scale and their complex relationship to biosocial contexts. This 400 level course for senior students will explore global health issues in greater depth and for a longer time period than the 300 level elective for juniors. Students will explore the relationship of global health issues to family medicine, primary care, and healthcare systems as a whole. The course will provide students with additional education in several areas including topical disease, global health disparities, global health policy, and risk/benefit analysis of global health interventions. The impact of these issues on the U.S. healthcare system will also be explored. The Global Health and Social Medicine course will employ multiple educational modalities, including pre-course reading requirements, online modules, traditional didactics, and hands on clinical experience under the direct supervision of experienced physicians in an international setting. The international setting will also include interaction with in-country ministry of health, regional healthcare stakeholders, and direct supervision of clinical activities consistent with the breadth of traditional family medicine (adult medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics, and geriatrics).
  
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    FMMD 415 - FAMILY MEDICINE AMBULATORY CARE

    [152 Hours]
    This course provides students an experience in the delivery of health care in an ambulatory setting. It may take place in a Family Medicine residency or in a selected private practice. During the four weeks, the student has the opportunity, under supervision, to provide primary care to patients ranging in age from infants to the elderly in a comprehensive-care setting. These experiences emphasize the importance of continuity of care and follow-up, prevention, and patient education. The electives listed below that focus on ambulatory care may also be used to satisfy the school requirement, with approval of the course director.
  
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    FMMD 418 - FAMILY MEDICINE SECONDARY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    Students may elect to spend a four-week block on the Family Medicine inpatient services of either Ochsner Medical Center - Kenner, University Medical Center in Lafayette, Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, or LSU Bogalusa Medical Center in Bogalusa. The goal of this rotation is for senior students to function as first-year house officers, developing clinical judgment skills by being placed in situations where they are directly responsible for patient care. This is done under the close supervision and direction of senior Family Medicine house officers and faculty. Within the confines of this supervision, the student is encouraged to take on as much responsibility as possible, including taking primary on-call duties. The acting intern is required to attend department conferences with the patient-care team.
  
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    FMMD 419 - FAMILY MEDICINE ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    This four week rotation provides senior students with the opportunity to begin functioning as interns. Students will develop additional skills in all areas of core competence. Particular emphasis is given to improving skills of clinical judgment and decision making by giving students more responsibility for patient care than they had in the third year. Students are encouraged to take increasing amounts of responsibility while under the close supervision of hours staff and faculty. In addition to patient care skills, students will also enhance their communication skills, and develop a better appreciation of systems based practice due to their involvement as a more prominent member of the health care team. Students will continue to increase their medical knowledge and skills of practice-based learning through reading, faculty feedback, and attendance at conferences and didactic sessions.
  
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    FMMD 420 - FAMILY MEDICINE CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    Legacy Course: FMMD 420A011 – FAMILY MEDICINE
  
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    FMMD 499 - FAMILY MEDICINE OUT-STATE ELEC

    [152 Hours]
    This course provides students an experience in the delivery of health care in an ambulatory setting. It may take place in a Family Medicine residency at a location outside of Louisiana. During the four weeks, the student has the opportunity, under supervision, to provide primary care to patients ranging in age from infants to the elderly in a comprehensive-care setting. These experiences emphasize the importance of continuity of care and follow-up, prevention, and patient education.

General Dentistry Residency

  
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    GDENT 5504 - PAIN CONTROL & SEDATION

    [2 Credits]
    This course is intended to provide residents/graduate students with the knowledge prerequisite to the establishment of a dental environment where patients will be able to satisfactorily accept the necessary professional services. Patient evaluation and the psychological aspects of patient management will be presented, along with the modalities of local anesthesia, nitrous oxide, and I.V. sedation. The techniques taught are designed to maintain intact the patient’s protective reflexes. The course is intended to provide only the didactic information necessary to safely administer these modalities; it is not designed as a substitute for the vital clinical experiences the residents/graduate students will receive in the other aspects of their training programs.

Genetics, Plant and Animal

  
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    GENET 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL GENETICS

    [15 Hours]
    Students will explore and learn the foundations of medical genetics. This will begin with principles of Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, and continue with the molecular basis of genetic disease. Topics for more detailed discussion will include inborn errors of metabolism, population genetics, cytogenetics, epigenetics, genetic testing, pharmacogenomics, and translational research in genetics. The course will also explore hereditary cancer syndromes and genetic therapies. Students will build on the foundational knowledge they learn in this course throughout the second year organ systems blocks, and as they advance into their clinical clerkships.
 

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