Dec 09, 2019  
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Genetics, Plant and Animal

  
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    GENET 228 - INTRODUCTION TO BIOINFORMATICS

    [1 Credit]
    This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the use of computer-based tools to obtain, analyze and publish biological data. One area of focus will be learning to use widely applicable database search strategies. Sessions will include introductions to DNA and protein sequence comparison, use of select bioinformatics portals and genome browsers as well as general strategies for finding, learning and using web-based bioinformatics tools.
  
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    GENET 231 - HUMAN MOLECULAR GENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    Covers advanced human molecular genetics concepts, including: genomics, pharmacogenomics, gene therapy, bioinformatics, gene cloning and genetic models.
  
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    GENET 234 - EPIGENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will examine epigenetic phenomena such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, genomic imprinting, and epigenetic reporgramming in embryonic stem cells and cloning. Emphasis will be placed on how loss of proper epigenetic control leads to human disease. By the end of the course, students should understand the differences between genetic and epigenetic influences on gene expression, the range of epigenetic mechanisms used by different eukaryotic organisms to regulate gene expression, how epigenetic modifications are propagated, and the phenotypic consequences of epigenetic regulation.
  
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    GENET 236 - GENECTIC EPIDEMIOLOGY AND POPULATION GENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the fundamental elements of mathematical and population genetics. Topics include probability, Bayes’ therorem, Hardy Weinberg equilibrium, inbreeding, selection, mutation, models for polygenic and multifactorial inheritance, linkage and simple segregation analysis. Prequisite: 231.
  
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    GENET 242 - ANIMAL MODELS OF HUMAN DISEASES

    [2 Credits]
    This genetics course examines the different types of animal models that mimic human genetic disorders and discusses some of the underlying biochemical principles that result from these genetic alterations. By the end of the course, students should understand how various types of animal models such as Non-Human Primates, Drosophila, and mouse are used to understand human genetic disorders including congenital diseases and cancer. The class will involve one, two-hour lecture per week.
  
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    GENET 245 - CANCER MOLECULAR GENETICS AND APPLICATIONS

    [3 Credits]
    This upper level course examines the types of genetic alterations that contribute to cancer development and discusses some of the underlying biochemical principals that result from these genetic alterations. By the end of the course, students should understand that various genotoxic stresses and subsequent genetic alterations can induce cancer development as well as promote in tumor progression. Further, students should be familiar with different approaches to identify candidate genes for cancer development and tumor progression. The class will involve two, two-hour lectures per week. It is offered jointly with the Dept of Genetics as GENET 245. Prerequisite: INTER 111 and 121, 122, 123 and 124.
  
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    GENET 246 - MOLECULAR MEDICINE IN DISEASE

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This course covers basic knowledge in virology and vector development for rational design and development of state-of-the-art gene and macromolecule delivery systems. Advanced technologies in evaluating and assessing gene and macromolecule transfer efficacy at the cellular and molecular level will be introduced. A general overview on the most recent advances in improving these delivery vehicles and clinical applications in the treatment of various inherited and acquired diseases will be provided. Towards the end of this course, issues related to ethical and legal concerns and regulatory approval processes through the federal government leading to human trials will be provided. Upon completion of this course, students should have a general concept of advantages and limitations of each of the gene/macromolecule transfer systems and understanding of the process from “bench” discovery to “bedside” utilization in clinics.
  
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    GENET 247 - PROPOSAL WRITING

    [2 Credits]
    This course provides students with the concepts and structure to prepare a successful proposal. Students will learn to develop a rigorous, well-defined experimental plan. The course will concentrate on NIH style proposals and format.
  
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    GENET 250 - Introduction to Research Methods

    [3-6 Credits]
    This course will provide an introduction to basic research methods during the first year for directly admitted Genetics graduate Students. The course will consist of three 12-week rotations in three different laboratories in the Department to receive introduction to research projects and techniques used in any specific laboratory. These rotations are required to be completed in the first two semesters (fall and spring) of the first year the student is enrolled in the program. The primary objective of these rotations is to help the graduate students in selecting a laboratory/Major Professor in performing the Dissertation Research . Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grades will be given for this course based on the preformance on the project and a report presentation to each of the laboratory mentors at the end of each rotation.
  
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    GENET 253 - LABORATORY METHODS BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    Student works in faculty laboratory to become acquainted with research projects and techniques.
  
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    GENET 256 - PRACTICAL BIOINFORMATICS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will focus on the practical use of current bioinformatic tools to further biological research. It is not a computer science course and no programming skills are required. Some theory will be included to help explain how certain tools work, but the main focus will be on learning to use the tools appropriately in order to obtain, analyze and publish biological data.
  
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    GENET 258 - ADVANCED GENOMICS

    [1 Credit]
    Rapid progress in human genome research heralded a new era of genomics and medicine. The potential of genetics and genomics to provide new paradigms for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease is immense. This course is intended to offer a comprehensive understanding of human genomics including technologies, applications, and data interpretation. Topics covered in this course will include up-to-date approaches in analysis of human genomes, assessment of disease risk, pharmacogenomics, and next generation sequencing technologies. The course is designed for PhD students interested in human genetics research and MD students preparing for personalized medicine in the clinic, and any students interested in learning how to interpret and understand his or her genome. At the end of the course, the students should have the advanced knowledge of genomics, the technology for genome analysis, and the ability to design and execute the project in their biomedical research and medical practice. Prerequisite: Inter 122/123 or permission from the instructor.
  
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    GENET 271 - MEDICAL GENETICS CLINIC

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of clinic per week. Patient contact in a clinical setting provides experience in interviewing and counseling techniques, risk assessment, medical and genetic aspects of inherited disease, an understanding of the limitations, interpretations and significance of specialized laboratory and genetic procedures, and a knowledge of available health care resources for appropriate referral. Up to four semesters may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: 231.
  
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    GENET 290 - JOURNAL CLUB

    [1 Credit]
    Both inherent and somatic alterations in the genome cause various kinds of diseases including congenital disorders and cancer. Small differences in genome, such as polymorphisms or epigenetic changes, also affect disease. This course will examine the types of genetic alterations that contribute to genetic disease, how to identify the genetic components and alterations, genotype-phenotype correlations, and functional analyses of responsible genes using recently published articles. By the end of the course, students should understand that various genetic alterations are responsible for the development of genetic disease.
  
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    GENET 291 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMAN GENETICS

    [1-4 Credits]
    This course is designed, depending upon the students’ interest and staff availability, to cover advanced aspects of topics already covered at an elementary level, or new topics such as cytogenetics, comparative genomics, immunogenetics, developmental genetics, genomic instability, and protein evolution.
  
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    GENET 292 - HUMAN CYTOGENETICS

    [3 Credits]
    Three hours of lecture per week. This lecture and laboratory course will focus on human chromosome structure, methodology, and techniques for the visualization of chromosome aberrations. Chromosome abnormalities will be discussed from the clinical and cytogenetic viewpoint. It will also cover current topics in Cytogenetics, including new methodologies and their use in clinical genetics and research.
  
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    GENET 299 - SEMINAR IN HUMAN GENETICS

    [1 Credit]
    Reports on research progress and on current literature. A total of four credits must be earned during the period of graduate work.
  
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    GENET 300 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-6 Credits]
    Research related work for PhD degree students prior to passing Preliminary Exam.
  
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    GENET 400 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Registration by permission of the Head of the Department. Amount of credit to be stated at the time of registration.
  
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    GENET 999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Students may register for “Exam Only” when they have completed their Preliminary Exam and expect to complete PhD requirements and graduate within 3 semesters. Students are allowed to register for “Exam Only” for a maximum of 3 semesters.

Health Sciences Administration

  
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    HLSC 2410 - HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    [4 Credits]
    Basic principles of the function, regulation, and coordination of the various organs and tissues of the human body are presented. Fundamental reaction capabilities of organic molecules and their functional groups, and the basic principles of physiological chemistry are presented. Laboratory experiments emphasize observation and interpretation, and are correlated closely with the lectures, and are chosen on the basis of understanding normal physiological mechanisms. 4 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: General biology, microbiology. Corequisite: HLSC 2412.
  
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    HLSC 2412 - HUMAN ANATOMY

    [4 Credits]
    Gross anatomy of the human body presented systematically. Laboratory demonstrations of body structure, with further study of these by students. 3 hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory. Prerequisite: General biology and microbiology. Corequisite: HLSC 2410.
  
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    HLSC 2416 - HEALTH ASSESSMENT THEORY

    [2 Credits]
    This course includes principles, knowledge, and skills utilized in the systematic appraisal of the individual’s health status throughout the life cycle. Corequisite: HLSC 2417, NURS 2351, 2362, 2372 Prerequisites: HLSC 2410, 2412
  
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    HLSC 2417 - HEALTH ASSESSMENT LABORATORY

    [1 Credit]
    Opportunites for performing health assessment and health promotion activities are proveded in hospital simulated and community-based laboratory settings.
  
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    HLSC 3409 - PHARMACOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    The course consists of lectures, conferences, and demonstrations leading to an understanding of the fundamental action of drugs and their effects through physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects of each group of drugs with the appropriate implications. 3 hours lecture. Prerequisites: HLSC 2410 and 2412
  
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    HLSC 3410 - PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Emphasis is on the physiological changes, which are the result of pathologic processes. Builds upon and expands knowledge gained in anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and health assessment. 3 hours lecture. Prerequisites: HLSC 2410, 2412.
  
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    HLSC 3411 - HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS

    [1 Credit]
    Legacy Course: HLSC 3411001 – HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS
  
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    HLSC 3412 - MANAGEMENT IN FORMAL ORGANIZATIONS

    [3 Credits]
    Legacy Course: HLSC 3412001 – MANAGEMENT IN FORMAL ORGANIZATIONS
  
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    HLSC 4411 - INTERDISCIPLINARY CARE OF THE DYING CLIENT AND FAMILY

    [2 Credits]
    Students will be introduced to the concepts and principles of care of the dying client and family across the lifespan and the role of the professional nurse in promoting excellence in end of life care. Students analyze factors that influence care of the dying client and the role of interdisciplinary team in relations to the physical, emotional, existential, and spiritual domains of the dying experience. Students explore their personal views and beliefs about death and dying.
  
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    HLSC 4413 - HEALTH CARE TECHNOLOGY

    [1 Credit]
    The course focuses on the methods and the tools used for information handling relative to selected aspects of health care, nurse education, and nursing research. The process of organizing, collecting, processing, and analyzing data using technology will be explored as the basis for clinical decision making and nurse education.
  
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    HLSC 6409 - ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides and overview of the major drug classifications with a focus on the pharamacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. An emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects, adverse effects, interactions, and patient safety issues with appropriate implications across the lifespan. The evolving knowledge regarding pharmacogenetics will be presented.
  
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    HLSC 6409 - ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides and overview of the major drug classifications with a focus on the pharamacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. An emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects, adverse effects, interactions, and patient safety issues with appropriate implications across the lifespan. The evolving knowledge regarding pharmacogenetics will be presented.
  
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    HLSC 6410 - PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Consists of lectures, conferences and demonstrations leading to an understanding of the fundamental action of drugs and their effects through physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects of each group of drugs with the appropriate implications. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of Anatomy and Physiology.
  
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    HLSC 6410 - PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Consists of lectures, conferences and demonstrations leading to an understanding of the fundamental action of drugs and their effects through physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects of each group of drugs with the appropriate implications. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of Anatomy and Physiology.
  
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    HLSC 6411 - HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS

    [3 Credits]
    Consists of lectures, conferences and demonstrations leading to an understanding of the fundamental action of drugs and their effects through physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects of each group of drugs with the appropriate implications. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of Anatomy and Physiology.
  
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    HLSC 6425 - PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Credits] Consists of lectures, conferences and demonstrations leading to an understanding of the fundamental action of drugs and their effects through physiological and biochemical mechanisms. Emphasis is placed on toxicology and side effects of each group of drugs with the appropriate implications. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of Anatomy and Physiology.
  
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    HLSC 7101 - ETHICS IN BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    This course focuses on ethical principles, theories, decision making models and analysis of biomedical research, education, practice and policy issues.
  
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    HLSC 7481 - TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCES

    [3 Credits]
    Establishes Independent Study using the HLSC 7481 designation when work is being done with a faculity member outside the discipline of nursing with the approval of the Major Professor.

Health Policy

  
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    HPSM 6225 - HEALTH OUTCOMES RESEARCH

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to help students understand outcomes research and to provide background on the basic tools used in outcomes studies. It will also enable students to critically review and use outcomes data for clinical decision-making as well as health care program planning and evaluation.
  
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    HPSM 6248 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

    [3 Credits]
    The focus of this course is upon individual and small group behavior and communication among employers, employees, hospitals, clinics, academic medical centers, insurance companies, HMOs and PPOS. The topics addressed in classes pertain to issues of management within the changing health care market.
  
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    HPSM 6258 - HEALTHCARE LAW AND ETHICS

    [3 Credits]
    This comprehensive course which addresses the principles and practice of health law and the relationship of health law and regulations to medical ethics. Subject matter encompasses federal and state laws and regulations that relate to the health professions and to provider organizations including professional liability, informed consent, rationing of health care, referral relationships, genetic testing, end of the life issues and others. Emphasis will be placed on application of these principles, laws, and regulations to evolving systems of providing and financing health care in the United States.
  
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    HPSM 6268 - HEALTH SERVICES ADMINISTRATION AND MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    This course is designed to provide Public Health and Health Professional students with an introduction to the skills needed to manage and lead health care and public health programs, organizations and systems with an emphasis on planning and execution. The key activities (planning, deciding, communicating, controlling), competencies (conceptual, technical, interpersonal, informational, decisional) and obligations (to individuals, the public, third parties, employers and profession) and the disciplines of resource management (human, organizational, financial) and quality and cost management will provide a theoretical and practical framework for the analysis of cases from the public and private sectors. The course is focused on what Public Health and Health professionals need to know in all areas of practice today and includes overviews of the topics, case presentations, and study questions.
  
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    HPSM 6269 - HEALTCARE ECONOMICS AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF HEALTHCARE SERVICES

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to give students an overview of the major economic considerations in the healthcare industry and to demonstrate how economic ideas are crucial to an understanding of the functioning of the health care system from both policy (external) and health care management (internal) points of view. There will be a strong emphasis both on economic theory and on empirical studies of the various topics and on economic evaluation of health care programs including cost effectiveness, benefit and utility analysis. Prerequisite: HPSM 6268
  
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    HPSM 6270 - FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND ACCOUNTING IN HEALTHCARE ORGANIZATIONS

    [3 Credits]
    This course introduces the most-used tools and techniques of health care financial management, including health care accounting and financial statements; managing cash, billings and collections; making major capital investments; determining cost and using cost information in decision-making; budgeting and performance measurement; and pricing.
  
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    HPSM 6271 - PRINCIPLES OF HEALTHCARE QUALITY

    [3 Credits]
    This course will serve as a survey of the major concepts of quality in healthcare and the basic techniques used in planning, controlling and improving quality in healthcare in order to equip students to understand the multiple dynamics at work in quality issues.
  
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    HPSM 6272 - METHODS IN HEALTHCARE QUALITY

    [3 Credits]
    This course is an in-depth presentation of methods and techniques for evaluating, monitoring, and improving the quality of healthcare. General approaches to the measurement of healthcare quality will be presented first. Report cards and provider profiles will then be discussed. After discussion of visual display of information, topics in statistical process control will be discussed in detail. Specific issues in healthcare measurement will then follow. A session will be devoted to patient satisfaction surveys. Additional sessions will concentrate on functional status measurement. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100.
  
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    HPSM 6273 - INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN HEALTHCARE

    [3 Credits]
    This course examines the rapidly evolving discipline of health informatics in the complex and diverse world of healthcare. The course will review the history, current applications, and the potential future of information, information management and information technology, including data acquisition, storage and processing; information systems (clinical and administrative); standards; security; decision support; and an understanding of medical/health informatics methods and principles.
  
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    HPSM 6274 - MARKETING IN HEALTHCARE

    [3 Credits]
    This course provides an introduction to nature of healthcare markets, healtcare consumers and consumer behavior, marketing strategies and techniques, market research, sources of market data and the future of healthcare marketing.
  
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    HPSM 6275 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT IN HEALTHCARE

    [2 Credits]
    This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of human resources management in a wide array of health care organizations at the corporate, departmental, team and individual level and to gain an appreciation for the distinct roles that managers and human resource professionals play in resolving conflicts and dealing with other human resources issues.
  
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    HPSM 6276 - ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP

    [3 Credits]
    This course studies collaborative leadership and the personalities and traits of effective leaders. Effective leaders work across boundaries in today’s world. Leaders in public health recognize that collaboration among organizations and people from diverse backgrounds is necessary to achieve successful health outcomes on the individual, community and national levels. The course explores how leaders achieve this and analyzes the differences between leadership and authority, the personality traits of successful leaders and the characteristics of the organizations they lead. The course uses the case study method where real situations are presented in which the leader must make decisions. The case studies, the supporting literature and personal experiences provide the material for learning.
  
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    HPSM 6277 - HEALTH ADVOCACY AND COMMUNITY BASED ACTIVISM

    [2 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to consider public health issues that have social, political, and economic determinants and to examine how health professionals can promote change through advocacy and activism. The course consists of 3 parts, which are intertwined. The first part covers social epidemiology, a history of the U.S. health system and the role of government in health care, and the principles of organizing for social change. The second part builds on this foundation taking up the most important issues of the day. Perspectives are provided by visiting faculty who have played leadership roles in solving problems on the front lines. The third part is like the second but is based on readings with discussions led by students.
  
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    HPSM 6279 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTHCARE QUALITY

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to enable students to apply what they have learned in the introductory and methods courses in healthcare quality and patient safety and to gain proficiency in areas of current interest. Prerequisites: HPSM 6271, 6272.
  
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    HPSM 6280 - CAPSTONE IN HEALTHCARE QUALITY AND PATIENT SAFETY

    [3 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to enable students to gain mastery in the principles and practice of healthcare quality. It builds on what they have learned and provides students the opportunity to demostrate what they have learned. Prerequisites: HPSM 6271, 6272, 6273, 6269.
  
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    HPSM 6288 - HEALTH POLICY AND LAW

    [3 Credits]
    This course explores the formation, implementation and evaluation of health policy/law and the impact of the political process on the delivery of health services.
  
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    HPSM 6289 - THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN HEALTH AND HEALTH CARE

    [3 Credits]
    This course examines the role of government in improving access to healthcare, controlling the costs, and improving the quality and safety of healthcare. The impact of recent developments in the private and public sectors including changes in the provider and payer systems and the experience of other countries with different systems for organizing and financing will be examined. Special topics will include prescription drugs, mental health services, long-term care and HIV. Prerequisite: HPSM 6288.
  
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    HPSM 6290 - PUBLIC HEALTH LAW, ETHICS, AND HUMAN RIGHTS

    [2 Credits]
    This course examines the legal powers and duties of the state that exist to assure the conditions for people to be healthy and the limits on that power to constrain the autonomy, privacy, liberty, proprietary, or other legally protected interests of individuals for protection or promotion of community health. Consideration is given to the role of the state from legal and ethical perspectives, to the application of ethical principles to populations as well as individuals and to the inherent rights that exist for all humans to a healthy life.
  
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    HPSM 6292 - HEALTH POLICY ANALYSIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course on policy analysis for public health focuses on key issues, concepts, arenas, and actors in decision making for health policy. Decision models will be used to describe, explain, and predict behavior and health outcomes. The policy analysis methods include: forecasting, case methods, technology, political fesibility, and economic viability assessments. Whether descriptive or analytical, the objective of any policy analysis is better understanding of information through research and actions taken by key stakeholders in the health arena. This course will teach students about government intervention to correct market failures and regulation of the health sector. For example, the U.S. political-economy pressures government officials to respond to demands for federal entitlement programs, private-sector health benefit programs, alternative health policy approaches, and regulation of health services. Regulatory mechanisms governing healthcare industries are explored.
  
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    HPSM 6400 - INDEPENDENT STUDY

    [1-3 Credits]
    This course provides the student the opportunity to study a topic in depth while under the guidance of faculty member. The focus of the course will be a specific aspect of a public health discipline which is not the primary focus of existing public health courses. The course will involve directed readings and may require completion of a paper or study project that provides evidence of comprehension and professional proficiency in the area studied. Independent Study may only be taken for a maximum of 3 credit hours toward the MPH Degree.
  
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    HPSM 6500 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN HEALTH POLICY AND SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

    [1-3 Credits]
    The course is designed, depending on the students’ interest and faculty availability, to cover current issues and special topics of interest in health policy and systems management. The hours and credits will be arranged depending on the particular topic.
  
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    HPSM 6600 - CULMINATING EXPERIENCE IN HEALTH POLICY AND SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    Students will synthesize and integrate knowledge acquired in coursework and other learning experiences and to apply theory and principles in case studies that approximates an aspect of public health practice in health policy and systems management. Prerequisite: BIOS 6100 or 6200; EPID 6210; ENHS 6238: BCHS 6212; HPSM 6268. By permission of instructor only.

Health Professions and Related

  
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    HTHPROF 6060 - MANAGERIAL LEADERSHIP IN HEALTH SCIENCE PROFESSIONS

    [3 Credits]
    The principles of strategic and personnel management, programming and budgetary analysis are emphasized. Accounting, economic, and financial analysis is incorporated into health care organizational decision-making. In addition, communication skills are presented as integral aspects of effective management.
  
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    HTHPROF 6070 - RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    An overview of the basic steps used to plan and conduct scientific research. The focus is on research designs relevant to clinical practice including group experimental and non-experimental designs; single subject experimental designs; and qualitative methodologies. Issues central to epidemiologic research and sequential clinical trials are considered in relation to their use in allied health. Related issues of measurement, data collection, and analysis and design validity or credibility are presented. The format is 3 hours of lecture/discussion/case application presented weekly.

Humanities Elective

  
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    HUMN 1000 - HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
  
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    HUMN 1100 - HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
  
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    HUMN 1200 - HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]
  
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    HUMN 2000 - HUMANITIES ELECTIVE

    [3 Credits]

Interdisciplinary Coursework

  
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    INTER 101 - INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH AND RESOURCES

    [0 Credit]
    This two-week course provides students with an intense introduction to the interdisciplinary program and is designed to familiarize them with the LSUHSC campus, services and department/programmatic opportunities available to them. It will also prepare students for their laboratory rotations and dissertation research by covering three general areas: laboratory safety; common lab techniques and research resources available on the campus. Students will spend two days in each department/program meeting faculty and learning about the research interests of those faculty.
  
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    INTER 111 - BIOCHEMISTRY

    [4 Credits]
    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the fundamental chemical principles associated with living organisms and establishes a foundation for subsequent courses in multiple disciplines. The molecular logic underlying the organization and regulation of living systems is emphasized. Topics covered include fundamental considerations of thermodynamics, the basics of protein structure-function, enzyme specificity and catalysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and intermediary metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, and nucleotides. The course consists of lectures , student presentations, problems sets, and discussions of classic and recent literature in the field.
  
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    INTER 121 - CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY A

    [3 Credits]
    This is an introductory course in molecular biology that focuses on the basic molecular mechanisms involved in the conversion of genetic information from DNA to functional protein. Topics covered include DNA and RNA structure, DNA replication, transcription, RNA splicing, protein translation, DNA recombination, and how gene expression is regulated.
  
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    INTER 122 - CELL AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY B

    [3 Credits]
    This is an introductory course in cell biology that focuses on the basic structure and function of the cell. Topics covered include structure and function of subcellular compartments, processing and trafficking of proteins through compartments, structure and function of cellular membranes and walls, and interactions between cells and the cellular environment.
  
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    INTER 123 - CONTROL OF GENE EXPRESSION

    [2 Credits]
    This course will focus on the regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and translational levels of eukaryotes. Genetics and epigenetics controls will also be discussed. Prerequisites: INTER 121 and 122.
  
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    INTER 124 - CELL SIGNALING AND CONTROL OF CELL CYCLE

    [3 Credits]
    This course will cover major signaling mechanisms relating to cell movement/morphogenesis, division and death. The fundamental characteristics of major classes of signaling molecules, including GTPases and protein kinases, will be discussed from structural, regulatory and (patho)physiological viewpoints.
  
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    INTER 125 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will cover the basic concepts of host-microbe interactions that occur during infectious diseases.  It will emphasize the importance of pathogens, their diversity and mechanisms of pathogenesis.  It will also expose students to major themes and concepts related to microbial pathogen research.
  
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    INTER 131 - BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS I

    [2 Credits]
    Development of organs, and function of tissues and organs that comprise the gastointestinal and renal systems will be presented; mechanisms of control and integration of the various functions will be discussed. An introduction to the pathophysiology, genetic basis, and therapeutics of some diseases will be included.
  
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    INTER 132 - BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS II

    [5 Credits]
    Development of organs, and function of tissues and organs that comprise the neurological, endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory systems will be presented; mechanisms of control and integration of the various functions will be discussed. An introduction to the pathophysiology, genetic basis and therapeutics of some diseases will be included as will an integrated approach to the effects of chronic stress on cell, organ and whole organism function.
  
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    INTER 141 - INTRODUCTION TO GENETICS

    [2 Credits]
    This course reviews the principles of genetics with applications to the study of biological function and disease.  Topics include: structure and function of genes, chromosomes, and genomes, Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, inborn errors of metabolism, epigenetics, cancer genetics, immunogenomics, pharmacogenomics, genetic variance and disease, genetic testing and treatment, precision medicine, and ethical issues in clinical genetics.
  
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    INTER 142 - PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY I

    [2 Credits]
    This course is designed to introduce basic concepts in pharmacology to beginning students.  The course will introduce students to pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics principles, membrane transport, drug distribution and metabolism, drug receptor interactions and behavioral pharmacology.
  
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    INTER 143 - EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN & ANALYSIS

    [2 Credits]
    The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of basic principles of experimental design, biostatistics and bioinformatics for first year graduate students. At the end of this course, students will have a basic understanding of experimental design, variables and controls, descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, and bioinformatics tools. Students will be able to present and interpret graphical data and be able to think critically about experimental design and statistics in published articles.
  
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    INTER 180 - SCIENCE TEACHING

    [1 Credit]
    Learn teaching techniques for elementary school science curriculum and instruction. The course will include assisting a teacher in applying basic science concepts and applications in the instruction of New Orleans public elementary school students. Up to four semesters may be taken for credit. This course may be repeated a maximum of four times for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
  
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    INTER 190 - SEMINAR

    [1 Credit]
    Biological Systems
  
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    INTER 191 - JOURNAL CLUB

    [1 Credit]
    Faculty presentations followed by student presentations on current literature and how to make scientific presentations.
  
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    INTER 217 - HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE

    [2 Credits]
    This history, methodologies, and philosophy of science are considered in a study discussion course.
  
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    INTER 220 - ETHICS IN THE BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

    [1 Credit]
    This lecture and discussion course will introduce first year graduate students to the principles of ethics in biomedical research and the contemporary practice of medicine in the research setting. The course will cover basic principles of bioethics and diverse applications of these principles in research and medical practice.
  
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    INTER 260 - RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH

    [1 Credit]
    This course illustrates the issues and dilemmas encountered by scientists conducting research. Using both presentations and case studies designed to foster class discussion, students will be required to use critical thinking as they integrate personal and professional ethical standards and apply them to the cases. Cases of scientific misconduct will be presented just as they appear in the NIH Guide and the headlines of the news. Students will work in small groups throughout the course. These small groups will also work together to prepare IRB protocols which will be peer- reviewed by faculty and by the rest of the class. These protocols will include human subjects, exempt protocols and use of animals.
  
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    INTER 281A - INTERPROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I (P/F)

    [2-30 Credits]
    This course provides the opportunity for students in each of the schools of the LSUHSC to learn with and from each other in a team-based learning environment focused on patient care. This interprofessional education (IPE)-based course is fundamentally structured with the goals of learned respect between and among the health care professional students and, ultimately, improved patient care. Students will be introduced to concepts of interprofessional education and practice as prescribed by the Institute of Medicine and the Interprofessional Educational Collaborative. The course consists of lectures, case discussions, and student team collaboration through case presentations. Session topics address core interprofessional practice competencies including: values and ethics, scope of practice, professional roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and effective team dynamics. In addition, current issues in healthcare and the value of the interprofessional practice community will be discussed. Students will participate, as members of a health care team, in a variety of patient-centered case reviews focused on the child, adult and geriatric populations. The culmination of the course will be IPE rounds presentations of each student team case assessment given by each student team to a larger audience of health care professionals. The course is a Pass/Fail course and permission of the course director is required for enrollment. Permission of the Dean required to register for Interprofessional Practice I.

Interprofessional Education

  
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    IPEC 281 - INTERPROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I (P/F)

    [2-30 Credits]
    This course provides the opportunity for students in each of the schools of the LSUHSC to learn with and from each other in a team-based learning environment focused on patient care. This interprofessional education (IPE)-based course is fundamentally structured with the goals of learned respect between and among the health care professional students and, ultimately, improved patient care. Students will be introduced to concepts of interprofessional education and practice as prescribed by the Institute of Medicine and the Interprofessional Educational Collaborative. The course consists of lectures, case discussions, and student team collaboration through case presentations. Session topics address core interprofessional practice competencies including: values and ethics, scope of practice, professional roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and effective team dynamics. In addition, current issues in healthcare and the value of the interprofessional practice community will be discussed. Students will participate, as members of a health care team, in a variety of patient-centered case reviews focused on the child, adult and geriatric populations. The culmination of the course will be IPE rounds presentations of each student team case assessment given by each student team to a larger audience of health care professionals. The course is a Pass/Fail course and permission of the course director is required for enrollment. Permission of the Dean required to register for Interprofessional Practice I.
  
  •  

    IPEC 281 - INTERPROFESSIONAL PRACTICE I (P/F)

    [2-30 Credits]
    This course provides the opportunity for students in each of the schools of the LSUHSC to learn with and from each other in a team-based learning environment focused on patient care. This interprofessional education (IPE)-based course is fundamentally structured with the goals of learned respect between and among the health care professional students and, ultimately, improved patient care. Students will be introduced to concepts of interprofessional education and practice as prescribed by the Institute of Medicine and the Interprofessional Educational Collaborative. The course consists of lectures, case discussions, and student team collaboration through case presentations. Session topics address core interprofessional practice competencies including: values and ethics, scope of practice, professional roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication and effective team dynamics. In addition, current issues in healthcare and the value of the interprofessional practice community will be discussed. Students will participate, as members of a health care team, in a variety of patient-centered case reviews focused on the child, adult and geriatric populations. The culmination of the course will be IPE rounds presentations of each student team case assessment given by each student team to a larger audience of health care professionals. The course is a Pass/Fail course and permission of the course director is required for enrollment. Permission of the Dean required to register for Interprofessional Practice I.

Mathematics

  
  •  

    MATH 1000 - ALGEBRA

    [3 Credits]

Medical Technology

  
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    MTEC MTEC - GENETICS IN THE CLINICAL LABORATORY

    [1 Credit]
    Lectures and discussions designed to familiarize the student with the principles and clinical applications of genetics. Topics include: the principles of inheritance, complex traits, chromosomes, gene structure and function, mutations, genomics, genetic technologies and current issues such as stem cell therapy and genetic testing.
  
  •  

    MTEC 3101 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY I

    [2 Credits]
    Instruction in the development, physiology, morphology and function of the cellular elements normally found in blood. Also included will be hemostatic mechanisms and disorders as well as laboratory testing for hemostasis evaluation.
  
  •  

    MTEC 3107 - IMMUNOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    Study of the structure, synthesis and functions of antibodies and antigen -antibody interaction. Cell-mediated and humoral immunity, hypersensitivity and tumor immunity is also covered as well lectures and discussions of immunologic diseases.
  
  •  

    MTEC 3112 - PROFESSIONAL SKILLS IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

    [3 Credits]
    Introduction to the role of the clinical laboratory scientist as a member of the health care team. Includes theory and practical experience in laboratory safety, phlebotomy, use and care of the microscope, and use of laboratory reagents and measuring devices. Also includes basic quality control, introductory statistics, laboratory math and basic skills for effective teaching in the clinical laboratory setting with emphasis on instructional objectives, learning styles, and exam item composition. Other topics include presentation skills, study skills, and time management.
  
  •  

    MTEC 3121 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY LAB I

    [2 Credits]
    Discussion, demonstations and laboratory exercises in routine and specialized manual and semiautomatic hematologic and coagulation procedures. Concurrent registration in MTEC 3101.
  
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    MTEC 4102 - CLINICAL MICROSCOPY

    [2 Credits]
    Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises focusing on the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of the urinary tract, with emphasis on concepts related to the formation, distribution, and function of urine and body fluids and their physical, chemical, and cellular composition in health and disease.
  
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    MTEC 4105 - CLINICAL PARASITOLOGY/MYCOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    Lecture and laboratory exercises on the classification and identification of medically important parasites and fungi including epidemiology, pathology, and morphology of infective and diagnostic forms.
  
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    MTEC 4107 - CLINICAL SEROLOGY LABORATORY

    [1 Credit]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures of manual and automated routine and advanced immunologic techniques. Emphasis will be placed on performance and interpretation of results of these techniques as applied to the clinical serology laboratory. Principles of instrumentation and methods of laboratory quality control will also be covered. Concurrent registration in MTEC 5128
  
  •  

    MTEC 4118 - LABORATORY MANAGEMENT

    [3 Credits]
    Concepts of medical laboratory management to include the dynamics of leadership, competence and performance improvement, inventory control, interpersonal skills, professional ethics, quality management, laws and accrediting standards regulating laboratories, compliance and third-party reimbursement policies, public relations, principles of marketing and cost accounting, and utilization review. Also includes concepts and principles of research design, exercises in evaluation of published studies, writing test questions, and professional development skills such as resume writing, interviewing, and understanding of compensation including benefits.
  
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    MTEC 4120 - CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY

    [2 Credits]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of manual and automated general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical chemistry laboratory. Includes principles of instrumentation and methods of laboratory quality control. Concurrent registration in MTEC 5109.
  
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    MTEC 4121 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY LABORATORY II

    [2 Credits]
    Discussion, demonstration, and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles and execution of manual and automated routine and advanced hematology procedures. Emphasis will be placed on performance and interpretation of results of these procedures as applied in the clinical hematology laboratory. Principles of instrumentation and methods of laboratory quality control will also be covered. Concurrent registration in MTEC 5101. Prerequisites: MTEC 3101, 3121.
  
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    MTEC 4122 - CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY LAB

    [2 Credits]
    Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures and interpretation of general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical immunohematology laboratory. Stresses importance of laboratory quality control in transfusion practices. Concurrent registration in MTEC 5111.
 

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