Nov 18, 2019  
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 
    
Catalog/Bulletin 2016-2017 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Medical Technology

  
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    MTEC 4125 - CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY

    [1 Credit]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the student laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of manual and automated techniques in the isolation and identification of clinically significant bacteria. Concurrent registration in MTEC 5104.
  
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    MTEC 4130 - CHEMISTRY/IMMUNOLOGY PRACTICUM

    [4 Credits]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures and interpretation of manual and automated, general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical chemistry, immunology, and serology laboratories. Includes principles of instrumentation and methods of laboratory quality control
  
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    MTEC 4131 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY/MICROSCOPY PRACTICUM

    [4 Credits]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of manual and automated, general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, and body fluids laboratories. Includes principles of instrumentation and methods of laboratory quality control.
  
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    MTEC 4132 - CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY PRACTICUM

    [3 Credits]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of general and advanced techniques as applied in the clinical immunohematology laboratory. Stresses importance of laboratory quality control in transfusion practices.
  
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    MTEC 4135 - CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY PRACTICUM

    [5 Credits]
    Discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises performed in the clinical laboratory designed to familiarize the student with the principles, procedures, and interpretation of manual and automated techniques as applied in the microbiology laboratory. Includes methods of laboratory quality control.
  
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    MTEC 4139 - REVIEW AND APPLICATION OF CLINICAL LABORATORY CONCEPTS

    [2 Credits]
    A self-directed learning course, which provides students the opportunity to apply skills acquired from course work to clinical laboratory science practice and to demonstrate problem-solving, communication and presentation skills. Students will be required to gather data and present a clinical case study involving several laboratory disciplines and/or solve and present a laboratory management problem.
  
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    MTEC 4140 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

    [1-3 Credits]
    With the consent of the Department Head, a student may elect to take this course on subjects of current interest in one of the special areas of medical technology. The content area may vary from year to year. The amount of credit a specific topic carries will be stated at registration.
  
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    MTEC 5101 - CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY II

    [2 Credits]
    Instruction in malignant and non-malignant megakaryocyte, erythrocyte, and leukocyte disorders with emphasis on pathophysiology, clinical and laboratory findings, which help in the differentiation of these disorders. Principles and applications of flow cytometry in the clinical laboratory will also be covered. Prerequisite: MTEC 3101, MTEC 3121
  
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    MTEC 5104 - CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY

    [4 Credits]
    Lectures on the physiology, metabolism, and pathogenesis of medically important bacteria and viruses with emphasis on their isolation and identification in the clinical laboratory.
  
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    MTEC 5109 - CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY

    [4 Credits]
    Lectures on the physiology and pathology of the major organ systems and their chemical constituents with emphasis on the principles of analytical techniques, instrumentation, and methodology used in the clinical chemistry laboratory in the investigation of pathological changes occurring in disease states.
  
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    MTEC 5111 - CLINCIAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Lectures on the theories and principles of antigen-antibody reactions as applied to blood-banking techniques with emphasis on cell-typing, cross matching and compatibility problems. Includes case study presentation, interpretation, and discussion.
  
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    MTEC 5117 - GENETICS IN THE CLINICAL LABORATORY

    [1 Credit]
    Lectures and discussions designed to familiarize the student with the principles and clinical applications of genetics. Topics include: the principles of inheritance, complex traits, chromosomes, gene structure and function, mutations, genomics, genetic technologies and current issues such as stem cell therapy and genetic testing.
  
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    MTEC 5119 - MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTICS

    [2 Credits]
    Lectures, discussions, demonstrations, and laboratory exercises designed to familiarize the student with the principles and clinical applications of nucleic acid-based molecular testing in the clinical laboratory.
  
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    MTEC 5128 - SEROLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    Lectures and discussions on the theory and measurement of antibody and antigens in infectious and autoimmune diseases. Emphasis placed on the principles, procedures, and interpretation of serological.
  
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    MTEC 6190 - INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE

    [2-4 Credits]
    Study and research of a specilized aspect of clinical laboratory science by an individual student under the supervision of a director approved by the department. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester-hours credit with a change in topic and permission of the department.

Medicine, M.D. Degree

  
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    MED 300 - MEDICINE

    [380 Hours]
    Instruction during this ten week bock is centered on the development of knowledge, skills and professional attitudes required for the practice of internal medicine, both in the hospital and the outpatient clinic. Students are assigned patients, and are required to perform histories and physical examinations, interpret laboratory data and X-rays, and develop differential diagnoses and treatment plans based on clinical data and directed reading, Daily rounds, small group resident and faculty teaching sessions, and student case presentations stress the team approach to patient care. Educational emphasis includes outpatient medicine, and the student spends four weeks in the ambulatory clinics. Departmental conferences such as Morning Report, Grand Rounds, and Case Management Conference, as well as student-oriented Clinical Core Conferences, EKG Conferences, Chest Conferences, and Professor Rounds emphasize essential concepts in medicine.
  
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    MED 400 - MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    Students are assigned to the Department of Medicine for four weeks each during the fourth year. They are offered a variety of locations at which to complete this required block, including the Medical Center of Louisiana-New Orleans, Earl K. Long Hospital in Baton Rouge, and University Medical Center in Lafayette. The students attend clinics and conferences at the assigned location. Emphasis is placed on further developing basic knowledge, skills and attitudes first learned during the third year clerkship. Fourth year students are expected to play a more active role in patient care in order to improve their clinical judgment and procedural skills.
  
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    MED 405 - HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY CONSULTS

    [152 Hours]
    Students are assigned to the Department of Medicine for four weeks each during the fourth year. They are offered a variety of locations at which to complete this required block, including the Medical Center of Louisiana-New Orleans, Earl K. Long Hospital in Baton Rouge, and University Medical Center in Lafayette. The students attend clinics and conferences at the assigned location. Emphasis is placed on further developing basic knowledge, skills and attitudes first learned during the third year clerkship. Fourth year students are expected to play a more active role in patient care in order to improve their clinical judgment and procedural skills.
  
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    MED 415 - AMBULATORY CARE

    [152 Hours]
    The goal of this elective is to familiarize the student with the ambulatory care of patients requiring the skills and expertise of specialists in internal medicine. Students will learn diagnostic and therapeutic regimens appropriate for patients seen and evaluated in a short clinical encounter. Strategies in management of clinical problems, including use of the history and physical examination, interpretation and cost effectiveness of necessary laboratory tests, performance of diagnostic procedures and prescribing of medication, diet and activity levels will be emphasized.
  
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    MED 418 - MEDICINE SECONDARY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    Students may elect to spend a second four-week block Acting Internship on the Internal Medicine. The goal of this rotation is for senior students to function as first-year house officers, developing clinical judgment skills by being placed in situations where they are directly responsible for patient care. This clerkship is performed under the close supervision and direction of Medicine house officers and faculty. Within the confines of this supervision, the student is encouraged to take on as much responsibility as possible, and is required to attend outpatient clinics and department conferences with the patient care team.
  
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    MED 419 - MEDICINE ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    This four week rotation provides senior students with the opportunity to begin functioning as interns. Students will develop additional skills in all areas of core competence. Particular emphasis is given to improving skills of clinical judgment and decision making by giving students more responsibility for patient care than they had in the third year. Students are encouraged to take increasing amounts of responsibility while under the close supervision of hours staff and faculty. In addition to patient care skills, students will also enhance their communication skills, and develop a better appreciation of systems based practice due to their involvement as a more prominent member of the health care team. Students will continue to increase their medical knowledge and skills of practice-based learning through reading, faculty feedback, and attendance at conferences and didactic sessions. On the medicine acting internship, studens may request to be assigned to the ICU service.
  
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    MED 424 - AMBULATORY HIV CARE

    [152 Hours]
    Following participation in this rotation, the student will be able to: Integrate the concepts of etiology, epidemiology, pathophysiology and preventive measures involved in HIV infection. Conduct an effective risk assessment. Recognize the importance of pre/post HIV test counseling. Perform a history and physical exam as part of the work up of a newly diagnosed HIV disease. Interpret symptoms, signs and diagnostic tests in staging HIV diseases. Discuss and utilize current guidelines for care of the early symptomatic HIV-positive individual, male and female. Introduction to current guidelines for HAART Therapy. Exposure to monitoring side effects of HAART Therapy. Use of resistance testing. Discuss the prophylaxis and treatment of the most common opportunistic infections. Experience the multi-disciplinary HIV Primary Care model, including the role of nurse practitioners, social workers, case manager, and health educators.
  
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    MED 432 - ADVANCED EMERGENCY MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    To obtain insight into the principles and practice of emergency medicine and trauma care in the Emergency Department. To improve clinical and technical skills in an emergency setting and develop familiarity with ambulatory care. To obtain skills in simple suturing, eye examinations, gynecological exams, and other common emergency procedures. Students function as interns while on the rotation and are given appropriate limited autonomy to further enhance their clinical and medical decision making skills.
  
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    MED 434 - RESEARCH ELECTIVE EMERGENCY MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    To introduce medical students to the mechanics of research in a mentoring relationship with emergency medicine faculty.
  
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    MED 437 - EMERGENCY MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    Students will spend 4 weeks in the Emergency Department, working an average of 50 hours per week on assigned shifts. Under staff supervision, students will evaluate patients, formulate plans for therapy, and perform procedures. They are expected to attend student and resident conferences which average 5 hours per week.
  
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    MED 438 - EMERGENCY MEDICINE RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    To become acquainted with research design and implementation as well as perform a small project for presentation and publication.
  
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    MED 440 - GASTROENTEROLOGY

    [152 Hours]
    A four-week elective comprehensive course intended to educate the student in the area of clinical gastroenterology at the Medical Center of Louisiana in New Orleans (University Hospital).
  
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    MED 442 - ENDOCRINE AND METABOLISM

    [152 Hours]
    There are two pathways in this elective program. The first is designed to afford students a unique clinical opportunity to become thoroughly familiar with the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and management of the major endocrine disorders (diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, myxedema, hypo and hyperpituitarism, adrenocortical and gonadal diseases, and abnormalities of bone and calcium metabolism). The second pathway allows the student to become involved in a research program. The problem should be decided in advance through discussions with the faculty.
  
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    MED 450 - HEMATOLOGY/ONCOLOGY

    [152 Hours]
    A four-week elective course offering additional training to students with a special interest in hematology and/or medical oncology. Under the direct supervision of faculty, fellows, and house staff the student will learn how to evaluate patients with hematologic and neoplastic diseases, obtain and interpret bone marrow and peripheral blood smears, formulate treatment plans and select parameters of response to therapy, and work as acting interns.
  
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    MED 456 - ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    [152 Hours]
    A four-week elective course used to introduce the clinical aspects of allergic diseases, introduce the clinical aspects of Transplantation, Immunology, and Immuno-deficient Diseases, and provide experience in basic and clinical aspects of immunological research.
  
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    MED 459 - INFECTIOUS DISEASES

    [152 Hours]
    A four-week elective course in which, the student will learn how to evaluate and treat patients with a variety of infectious diseases. The student will be instructed in the principals of antimicrobial therapy. The student will learn how to collect, transport and process specimens collected from patients seen in consultation with infectious disease staff.
  
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    MED 465 - NEPHROLOGY

    [152 Hours]
    A four-week elective in which the student will be responsible for the work-up of at least one patient per week, and will attend all rounds and conferences of the subspecialty and weekly medical staff clinic. The student will learn the techniques of hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. The student will also observe and work on the transplantation service. There will be participation in the evaluation and care of private nephrology patients one or more days a week. Students will also be able to participate in the clinical study of patients enrolled in the protocols of our Research Hypertension Clinic/Section of Nephrology. This will involve the performance for physical examinations, renal function studies and the use of new techniques such as the 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitor.
  
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    MED 469 - NUTRITION/METABOLISM

    [152 Hours]
  
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    MED 472 - PULMONARY MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    The student will make daily rounds with interns, residents, fellows and attending staff on the Inpatient Pulmonary and Pulmonary Consult services. The student will be instructed in chest radiograph, chest CT and pulmonary function test interpretation, and will have an opportunity to develop these skills during the month. A wide variety of pulmonary conditions will be encountered while performing consultations and primary patient care. The student may participate in procedures including: thoracentesis, percutaneous tracheostomy, fiberoptic brochoscopy and pleural needle biopsy. Students will receive instruction in the outpatient evaluation of common and unusual pulmonary diseases in the weekly Chest Clinic and Tuberculosis Clinic.
  
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    MED 474 - MICU ELECTIVE

    [152 Hours]
    Students are expected to develop the skills necessary to obtain a history and perform a complete physical examination as required to care for patients with respiratory complaints and critical illness. Trainees are also expected to gain familiarity with consultation in the management of pulmonary and ICU patients. Students obtain exposure to the diagnosis and care of disorders of the lungs, upper airways, and chest wall, as well as gain experience in the coordinated care of critically ill patients. Students should gain familiarity with the management of common clinical presentations of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine. In addition to skills in differential diagnoses and patient care, they should develop the ability to perform selected procedures safely, interpret primary date appropriately, and understand the indications and limitations of more specialized testing. Specific educational aims include developing expertise in diagnosis and management of patients with respiratory diseases and/or critical illness, reinforcing basic concepts in respiratory and cardiovascular physiology, understanding the role of the Pulmonary specialist as a consultant and primary care provider, learning the diverse roles of the general internist in the ICU, providing primary care for medical patients, coordinating care in complicated patients with multiple medical problems necessitating multi-specialty physician input, providing medical consultation in the care of critically ill surgical patients, becoming familiar with procedures and technological devices utilized in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients in Pulmonary/Critical Care, and gaining experience in complicated ethical and social issues.
  
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    MED 476 - RHEUMATOLOGY CONSULTS

    [152 Hours]
    The student will participate in the evaluation of patients at weekly Immunology and Rheumatology Clinics and will be expected to read the current literature pertinent to the patients. Other activities include teaching rounds three times a week, review of clinic X-rays, weekly case conference, and weekly seminar. One of these seminars will be given by the student.
  
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    MED 483 - REHABILITATION MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    This 4-week course in Rehabilitation Medicine is directed toward the evaluation of prospective rehabilitation patients in a hospital setting. This will include the early rehabilitation care in the acute care setting and coordination of rehabilitation with the Trauma service.
  
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    MED 484 - MUSCULOSKELETAL MEDICINE

    [152 Hours]
    This is a 4-week elective in Musculoskeletal and Pain Medicine in the Section of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Concepts and treatments related to neurological and musculoskeletal disorders are emphasized. In addition, musculoskeletal injection techniques as well as EMG and Nerve Conduction Studies is part of this elective.
  
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    MED 485 - SPINAL CORD INJURY REHABILITATION

    [152 Hours]
    This 4-week elective combines 2 weeks of Inpatient Rehabilitation at Touro Infirmary with 2 weeks of outpatient physical medicine and rehabilitation clinics at the VA. This elective is designed to provide a broad overview of both inpatient rehabilitation topics (e.g., spinal cord and brain injury), and outpatient rehabilitation topics (e.g., amputees, orthotics, and pain syndromes).
  
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    MED 486 - REHABILITATION MEDICINE AT VA HOSPITAL

    [152 Hours]
    This 4-week course in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation is directed toward learning outpatient rehabilitation of patients with pain syndromes, spinal cord injury, stroke, arthritis and neuromuscular disease. The course also exposes the student to EMG and Nerve Conduction Studies, as well as musculoskeletal injection techniques.
  
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    MED 498 - MEDICINE RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
    To introduce medical students to the mechanics of independent research in various fields of internal medicine.
  
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    MED 499 - INTERNAL MEDICINE OUT-STATE ELEC

    [152 Hours]
    Students are assigned to the Department of Medicine at an out of system location for four weeks each during the fourth year. The students attend clinics and conferences at the assigned location. Emphasis is placed on further developing the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes first learned during the third-year clerkship. Fourth-year students are expected to play a more active role in patient care in order to improve their clinical judgment and procedural skills.

Medical Clinical Sciences

  
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    MCLIN 101 - CLINICAL SKILLS INTEGRATION 101

    [78 Hours]
    This course includes a study of cell biology and the histology of tissue types and organ systems. The first part of the course stresses cellular ultra structure, and function and the four basic tissue types. Laboratory exercises, using both computerized virtual slides and microscope slides, include the identification of cell types, cell organelles, and the basic tissues at the light and electron microscopic levels. The second part of the course deals with the histology and function of the organ systems. This part of the course is integrated with the topics being covered in Human Gross Anatomy and Prenatal Development as much as possible. The course is designed to provide basic information that will be utilized in preclinical and clinical programs throughout the medical curriculum.
  
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    MCLIN 102 - CLINICAL SKILLS INTEGRATION 102

    [60 Hours]
    This course includes a study of cell biology and the histology of tissue types and organ systems. The first part of the course stresses cellular ultra structure, and function and the four basic tissue types. Laboratory exercises, using both computerized virtual slides and microscope slides, include the identification of cell types, cell organelles, and the basic tissues at the light and electron microscopic levels. The second part of the course deals with the histology and function of the organ systems. This part of the course is integrated with the topics being covered in Human Gross Anatomy and Prenatal Development as much as possible. The course is designed to provide basic information that will be utilized in preclinical and clinical programs throughout the medical curriculum.
  
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    MCLIN 110 - FOUNDATIONS OF POPULATION MEDICINE AND HEALTH SYSTEMS

    [40 Hours]
    This course will provide an introduction of the population approach to health and disease. More specifically, it will provide students with foundational knowledge of epidemiology, biostatistics, principles of evidence based medicine, critical evaluation of the medical literature, determinants of health, healthcare disparities, disease prevention, population management, the healthcare system, trends in healthcare costs, practice models, quality improvement, and patient safety. The course will utilize a combination lectures, independent study to prepare for interactive class sessions, team based learning, question analysis, and quizzes. There will be a final exam that uses national board style questions, as well as other question formats. Overall course objectives are as follows: 1) Define key concepts of epidemiology and biostatistics. Use these concepts in the analysis of disease data, strategies for disease management and prevention, design of improvements in health care delivery, and critical evaluation of research; 2) Describe the community/population based approach to disease and health; including health determinants, disparities, disease prevention, and disease management; 3) Use the principles of evidence based medicine in the search, quality assessment, critical evaluation of research papers and other sources of medical information; 4) Describe the structure and financing of the U.S. healthcare system, trends in healthcare costs and sustainability, scope of practice of healthcare professionals, and factors suggesting a need for reform; 5) Use outcomes data to assess healthcare quality, and develop appropriate metrics that could be used for quality improvement.
  
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    MCLIN 120 - PRIMARY CARE ELECTIVE

    [160 Hours]
    The Area Health Education Centers (AHECs) of Louisiana are community based non-profit organizations whose primary responsibility is to improve the quality and distribution of health care personnel within the state of Louisiana. The purpose of this introductory four-week elective is to provide medical students and opportunity to observe medicine as it is practiced by primary care physicians in a rural or inter-city underserved ambulatory care environment. This elective offers five primary care clinical specialties: Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and General Surgery.
  
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    MCLIN 201 - CLINICAL SKILLS INTEGRATION 1 (PASS/FAIL)

    [33 Hours]
    The Clinical Skills Integration course is required for all second year medical students. This course continues the teaching and development of clinical skills that began in year one. History taking, physical examination, and clinical reasoning are practiced in clinical settings. Virtual settings (e.g. computer based cases and role-playing) are also used. Motivational interviewing is practiced and applied to a variety of clinical situations (e.g. smoking cessation , exercise , weight loss, substance abuse) using role-play . New skills are taught and practiced to further prepare students for their clinical clerkships. These include the patient write-up, full history and physical, and the critical evaluation of the medical literature (‘journal club’ presentations). Students continue to explore the themes of medical ethics and cultural competency (which are addressed throughout the curriculum). In addition, students will explore themes of quality improvement (QI) and disease prevention in small group exercises and reflective essay assignments. Finally, students are asked to begin exploring their career interests by choosing from a variety of clinical ‘selectives’ during semester 1 or semester 2 of the second year. Small group seminars in motivational interviewing role-plays, Ql discussions, and journal club presentations are directly relevant to disease processes discussed in concurrent systems courses. . Students must complete all required components and demonstrate professionalism throughout the course in order to achieve a passing grade.
  
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    MCLIN 202 - CLINICAL SKILLS INTEGRATION 2

    [33 Hours]
    The Clinical Skills Integration 2 course is required for all second year medical students. This course continues the teaching and development of clinical skills that began in year 1. History taking, physical examination, and clinical reasoning are practiced in clinical settings. Virtual settings (e.g. computer based cases and role-playing) are also used. Motivational interviewing is practiced and applied to a variety of clinical situations (e.g. smoking cessation, exercise, weight loss, substance abuse) using role-play . New skills are taught and practiced to further prepare students for their clinical clerkships. These include the patient write-up, full history and physical, and the critical evaluation of the medical literature (‘journal club’ presentations) . Students continue to explore the themes of medical ethics and cultural competency (which are addressed throughout the curriculum). In addition, students will explore themes of quality improvement (QI) and disease prevention in small group exercises and reflective essay assignments. Finally, students are asked to begin exploring their career interests by choosing from a variety of clinical ‘selectives’ during semester 1 or semester 2 of the second year. Small group seminars in motivational interviewing role-plays, Ql discussions, and journal club presentations are directly relevant to disease processes discussed in concurrent systems courses. Students must complete all required components and demonstrate professionalism throughout the course in order to achieve a passing grade.
  
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    MCLIN 220 - END OF LIFE CARE (PASS/FAIL)

    [25 Hours]
    (P/F) The End-of-Life-Care Elective is a course designed for second year medical students to explore the issues surrounding patients facing terminally ill diseases. While the students participating in the course are in school to study health and illness, this course is primarily a lesson in the emotional, spiritual, and interpersonal relationships in the patient approaching end of life. Thus, while some time is dedicated to learning the components of effective medical management of hospice patients, the course emphasizes understanding the impact of a terminal disease on a person’s conscience and the provision of compassionate care. The course objectives are to develop a relationship with a dying patient; to identify some of the bio-psychosocial issues faced by dying patients; to enhance students’ communication skills with current and future patients; to witness treatment of terminally ill patients in modern health care systems; to identify some of the ethical principles pertinent to end-of-life care; to better understand the role of hospice in the care of terminally ill patients and their families; and to learn about the interdisciplinary approach to end-of-life care. Each student in the course is required to attend at least once hospice team meeting, meet with their assigned patient along with a hospice team member, and have two additional meetings with their patient over the course of the semester. Interlaced with these patient visits will be small-group sessions led by third and/or fourth-year medical students and SOM faculty who will facilitate a dialogue about the students’ experiences. Students will be evaluated by the SOM faculty on a Pass/Fail scale, on the basis of completion of all course responsibilities such as individual patient encounters and completion of reading assignments, and their level of engagement in small group sessions.
  
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    MCLIN 230 - FOUNDATIONS OF DISEASE AND THERAPY

    [72 Hours]
    The Foundations of Disease and Therapy course is interdisciplinary, with contributions from the departments of microbiology, pathology, and pharmacology. The course provides students with fundamental concepts of disease processes (e.g. inflammation, repair, regeneration, and neoplasia), infection (e.g. the nomenclature, classification, structure, and virulence of micro-organisms), and therapy (e.g. pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, receptor mechanisms, and transduction). Principles of diagnostic and radiologic testing will also be discussed. Clinical case discussions are used when appropriate. This course provides the foundation for subsequent learning in the sophomore year systems courses.
  
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    MCLIN 231 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE HEMATOLOGIC SYSTEM

    [38 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Hematologic System is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major hematologic diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings , clinical aspects of hematologic diseases are emphasized. These Iinclude screening and prevention, history taking , physical examination , diagnostic testing , clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic) . The course employs a variety of teaching modalities . These include lectures, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions . The Disease and Therapy of the Hematologic System course assesses students based on quiz grades , TBL grades , professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 232 - NEUROSCIENCE AND DISEASES OF THE NEUROLOGICAL-PSYCHIATRIC SYSTEMS

    [144 Hours]
    Neuroscience and Diseases of the Neurological-Psychiatric Systems is a required course for all second year medical students . The course provides an introduction to the form, function, and dysfunction of the nervous system. The course integrates the anatomy and physiology of the neurological system, along with the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major neurological and psychiatric diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of neurological and psychiatric diseases are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking , physical examination, radiographic imaging (including MRI) diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic) . The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, video demonstrations, patient presentations , computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions . Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to neurological and psychiatric disease and treatment. The Neuroscience and Diseases of the Neurological-Psychiatric Systems course assesses students based on quiz grades , TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 233 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE MUSCULOSKELETAL AND DERMATOLOGIC SYSTEMS

    [34 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Musculoskeletal and Dermatologic Systems is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major musculoskeletal and dermatologic diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of disease are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to musculoskeletal disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Musculoskeletal and Dermatologic Systems course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 234 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM

    [54 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Cardiovascular System is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major cardiovascular diseases. ln addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of cardiovascular diseases are emphasized . These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to cardiovascular disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Cardiovascular System course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 235 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE PULMONARY SYSTEM

    [54 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Pulmonary System is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major pulmonary diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of pulmonary diseases are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, I small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to pulmonary disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Pulmonary System course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 236 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE RENAL SYSTEM

    [60 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Renal System is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major renal and urologic diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of renal diseases are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to renal disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Renal System course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 237 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL SYSTEM

    [60 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Gastrointestinal System is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major gastrointestinal diseases. . In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of gastrointestinal diseases are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to gastrointestinal disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Gastrointestinal System course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 238 - DISEASE AND THERAPY OF THE REPRODUCTIVE AND ENDOCRINE SYSTEMS

    [60 Hours]
    Disease and Therapy of the Reproductive and Endocrine Systems is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to major reproductive and endocrine diseases. In addition to these basic science underpinnings, clinical aspects of endocrine diseases are emphasized. These include screening and prevention, history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, clinical reasoning, and management (acute and chronic). The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures, small group laboratory sessions, computer based cases, and team based learning (TBL) sessions. Small group discussions in the concurrent Clinical Skills Integration course will include content relevant to endocr ine disease and treatment. The Disease and Therapy of the Reproductive and Endocrine Systems course assesses students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, performance in the skills laboratory, professionalism, and a final exam provided by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
  
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    MCLIN 239 - SYNTHESIS OF MULTISYSTEM DISEASE AND THERAPY

    [30 Hours]
    Multisystem Disease and Therapy is a required course for all second year medical students. The course integrates the pathology, microbiology, and pharmacology relevant to multisystem diseases. Clinical aspects of multisystem diseases are emphasized and pertinent basic science concepts are reviewed. Clinical aspects include history taking, physical examination, diagnostic testing, and clinical reasoning. In addition, both acute and chronic aspects of management are discussed. The course employs a variety of teaching modalities. These include lectures with interactive question analysis and team based learning (TBL) sessions. The Multisystem Disease and Therapy course assess students based on quiz grades, TBL grades, and professionalism.
  
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    MCLIN 300 - CLINICAL CARE PLANNING ELECTIVE (PASS/FAIL)

    [76 Hours]
    This 3-week clerkship provides third year students with the opportunity to rotate on a specialty or subspecialty in which they are potentially interested for residency. Some of the specialties allowed for this elective have not been formally available to third year students in the past (ophthalmology, emergency medicine, radiology, pathology, dermatology, anesthesiology). Students may also choose to rotate on a second surgical subspecialty (such as orthopedics, urology, ENT, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, vascular surgery) as an elective even though they are required to select one surgical subspecialty as part of their required surgery clerkship. While on the clinical elective, students will perform clinical duties (e.g. patient evaluations) and attend required didactic sessions as determined by department-specific directors. The course falls within the 12-week block during which students will take their required Surgery clerkship, so students will also be required to attend Surgery didactics sessions while on the clinical elective.
  
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    MCLIN 310 - CLERKSHIP PREPARATION

    [24 Hours]
    The Clerkship Preparation course provides instruction on clinical skills that students will need to utilize in their third year clerkships, including history taking, physical examination skills, medical record documentation, and professionalism. Topics that will be covered include proper use of medical interpreters, clerkship roles and responsibilities, and clinical reasoning processes. In addition, students will receive instruction on common radiologic tests and common ophthalmologic problems that they will likely encounter during their clerkships. Students will be required to gather historical data and write a daily progress note for a simulated patient scenario. Students will be required to engage in independent study work through a case and produce written documentation that includes the history, a problem list, and a differential diagnosis. Students will practice physical examination skills and receive an introduction to surgical skills and commonly used invasive equipment. Students will receive training on the electronic medical record that they will utilize during their clerkships. Students will be expected to maintain integrity and professional responsibly in attending course sessions and completing assignments.
  
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    MCLIN 400 - CRITICAL CONCEPTS

    [152 Hours]
    The Critical Concepts rotation provides exposure to critical topics in patient care, procedural skills, medical knowledge, and disease management using a variety of teaching modalities: traditional didactics, patient simulations, on-line interactive modules, quizzes, and direct clinical experience in emergency and ICU settings. This rotation provides every senior medical student, regardless of career choice, with a broad and solid foundation in the principles and skills needed to care for acute and emergency patients. Having completed their core junior rotations, senior students will be challenged to apply their skills and knowledge to more complicated and critical patient care situations. This rotation will also provide senior students with the opportunity to refine and expand their skills in commonly performed procedures and medical interventions. Furthermore, senior students will develop a more sophisticated understanding of their upcoming roles as resident physicians with increased responsibility to individual patients, to health care team, and to the health care system.
  
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    MCLIN 418 - CRITICAL CONCEPTS SECONDARY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
    Legacy Course: MEDC 418A001 – HIV CLINIC
  
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    MCLIN 420 - CRITICAL CONCEPTS CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    Legacy Course: ANES 420A005 – PRACTICAL ANESTHESIOLOGY
  
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    MCLIN 498 - SENIOR RESEARCH ELECTIVE

    [152 Hours]
    This four week elective rotation provides senior students with the opportunity to work with clinical faculty on a research project. The research project is individualized and directed by a faculty mentor who has an established research background. The focus of the research can be either basic science or applied clinical science depending upon the interests of the student. Emphasis is placed upon learning and utilizing rigorous scientific methods, data collection, and interpretation. Students will also learn about writing IRB protocols.

Medicine Pediatrics

  
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    MEDPED 415 - MEDICINE/PEDIATRICS AMB CARE

    [152 Hours]
    The goal of this elective is to familiarize the student with the ambulatory care of patients requiring the skills and expertise of specialists in Medicine/Pediatrics. Students will learn diagnostic and therapeutic regimens appropriate for patients seen and evaluated in a short clinical encounter. Strategies in management of clinical problems including use of the history and physical examination, interpretation and cost effectiveness of necessary laboratory tests, performance of diagnostic procedures and prescribing of medication, diet and activity levels will be emphasized.
  
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    MEDPED 420 - MEDICINE/PEDIATRICS CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
    The major objective of this rotation is to give exposure to the Medicine/Pediatrics subspecialty of internal medicine. The student will be supervised by physicians who are board-certified in the both Medicine and Pediatrics. A major focus of the rotation will be to provide one-on-one teaching with both Medicine and Pediatric patients.
  
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    MEDPED 498 - MED/PEDS RESEARCH

    [152 Hours]
  
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    MEDPED 499 - MEDICINE/PEDIATRICS OUT-STATE ELEC

    [152 Hours]
    Medicine/Pediatrics Out-State Elec

Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology

  
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    MICRO 100 - INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    [30 Hours]
    This course will provide students with foundational knowledge in immunology. Basic immunological concepts are introduced, including overviews of microbes and the immune system, followed by classes on innate and adaptive immunity, immunity at mucosal surfaces, principles of vaccination, and immune dysregulation (hypersensitivity, immune deficiencies, autoimmunity and transplant immunology). Lectures, clinical case presentations and TBLs in this course serve as a foundation for understanding of immunologic disease in more depth during the L2 systems blocks. The course also serves as a foundation for understanding immune responses to microbial pathogens in infectious diseases.
  
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    MICRO 222 - MEDICAL IMMUNOLOGY

    [2 Credits]
    A comprehensive course covering the principles of immunology and the application of these principles to the diagnosis and control of immunologic and infectious diseases (graduate course which correlates to MICRO 100).
  
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    MICRO 224 - INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will cover the basic concepts of host-microbe interactions that occur during infectious diseases. It will emphasize the importance of pathogens, their diversity and mechanisms of pathogenesis. It will also expose students to major themes and concepts related to microbial pathogen research.
  
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    MICRO 225 - ADVANCED MEDICAL BACTERIOLOGY

    [2-4 Credits]
    Permission required. An advanced study of bacteria pathogenic to man, their cultural and antigenic characteristics, their pathogenic mechanisms, the immune responses of the human host to their invasion, the epidemiology of the diseases they produce, and their antibiotic and chemotherapeutic sensitivity.
  
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    MICRO 228 - LABORATORY ROTATIONS IN MICROBIOLOGY

    [1-6 Credits]
    This course allows students to participate in ongoing research in two or three laboratories during a semester. Registration is by permission only.
  
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    MICRO 229 - ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH LITERATURE

    [1 Credit]
    Student will present research articles and critically evaluate the methods, approaches, and interpretations of the research. Students will be graded Pass or Fail.
  
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    MICRO 231 - MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF EUKARYOTIC PATHOGENS

    [2-4 Credits]
    This course focuses on recent approaches in studying eukaryotic pathogens. Representative pathogenic ukaryotes (parasites, fungi) will be studied. Course will emphasize essential elements of experimental design, analysis of results and scientific logic.
  
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    MICRO 250 - ADVANCED MICROBIAL PATHOGENESIS

    [3 Credits]
    This course will cover in depth discussions of specific host-microbe interactions that occur during infectious disease. Each week students will either receive a journal article or problem set. The focus of this course is to foster development of critical thinking and scientific presentation skills using examples of current and/or seminal research in microbial pathogenesis. Students will learn to critically analyze and present data obtained from experimental, scientific, and translational papers.
  
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    MICRO 276 - GENERAL AND MOLECULAR VIROLOGY

    [2-4 Credits]
    Permission required. An introduction to the cellular and molecular biology of bacterial and animal viruses. Particular emphasis is given to virus cell interactions at the molecular level, including the immune response to viral infections, as well as to current research on mechanisms of viral replication and its effects on biochemical regulatory mechanisms in host cells. Lectures and seminars.
  
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    MICRO 281 - SELECTED TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY

    [1-4 Credits]
    Topic and credit by arrangement.
  
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    MICRO 296 - FUNDAMENTALS OF IMMUNOLOGY

    [2-4 Credits]
    This course begins with the study of the basic principals of modern immunology and the methods used in immunological research, followed by an advanced level study of selected current topics. Permission required.
  
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    MICRO 298 - SEMINAR IN MICROBIOLOGY

    [1 Credit]
    Departmental seminar series.
  
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    MICRO 299 - RESEARCH PROPOSAL IN MICROBIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    A required course for all doctoral candidates in which the student prepares, in National Institutes of Health grant format, a written proposal on the candidates dissertation research. The student presents and defends his proposal to his/her research committee as a basis for the Preliminary Examination.
  
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    MICRO 300 - THESIS RESEARCH

    [1-7 Credits]
    Research related work for PhD degree students prior to passing Preliminary Exam or for MS degree students working on thesis.
  
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    MICRO 400 - DISSERTATION RESEARCH

    [1-9 Credits]
    Research related work for PhD candidates.
  
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    MICRO 999 - EXAM ONLY

    [0 Credit]
    Students may register for “Exam Only” when they have completed their Preliminary Exam and expect to complete PhD requirements and graduate within 3 semesters. Students are allowed to register for “Exam Only” for a maximum of 3 semesters.
  
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    MICRO 2000 - MICROBIOLOGY

    [3 Credits]
    Microbiology
  
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    MICRO 2001 - MICROBIOLOGY LAB

    [1 Credit]

Military Science

  
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    MILS 3301 - BASIC TACTICS I

    [3 Credits]
    Usually offered fall semester. A course through which cadets sudy, practice, and evaluate adaptive leadership skills as they are presented with scenarios related to squad tactical operations. Specific feedback is given on leadership attributes and actions. Based on such feedback, cadets continue to develop critical thinking and tactical leadership abilities in preparation for ROTC’s Leadersip and Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Prerequisite: MILS 2202 or permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    MILS 3302 - BASIC TACTICS II

    [3 Credits]
    Usually offered spring semester. Intense situational leadership challenges are offered to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members when “under fire” are evaluated and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed in preparation for the ROTC Leadership and Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop-leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operation orders. Prerequisite: MILS 3301 or permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    MILS 3311 - BASIC TACTICS I LEADERSHIP LAB

    [1 Credit]
  
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    MILS 3312 - BASIC TACTICS II LAB

    [1 Credit]
    Usually offered spring semester. Intense situational leadership challenges are offered to build cadet awareness and skills in leading small units. Skills in decision-making, persuading, and motivating team members when “under fire” are evaluated and developed. Aspects of military operations are reviewed in preparation for the ROTC Leadership and Development and Assessment Course (LDAC). Cadets are expected to apply basic principles of the Law of Land Warfare, Army training, and motivation to troop-leading procedures. Emphasis is also placed on conducting military briefings and developing proficiency in Garrison operation orders. Prerequisite: MILS 3301 or permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    MILS 4401 - ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP

    [2 Credits]
    Usually offered fall semester. Course develops cadet proficiency in planning, executing, and assessing complex operations, functioning as member of staff, and providing performance feedback to subordinates. Cadets assess risk, make ethical decisions, and lead fellow ROTC cadets. Lessons on military justice and personnel procedures prepare cadets to make the transition to Army officers. Cadets identify responsibilities of key staff, coordinate staff roles, and use situational opportunities to teach, train, and develop subordinates. Prerequisite: MILS 3302 or permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    MILS 4402 - ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP II

    [2 Credits]
    Usually offered spring semester. Course explores the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations. Cadets examine differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. They also explore aspects of interacting with nongovernmental organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. The course places significant emphasis on preparing cadets for their first assignment. Prerequisite: MILS 4401 or permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    MILS 4411 - ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP LAB

    [1 Credit]
    ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP LAB
  
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    MILS 4422 - ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP II LAB

    [1 Credit]
    ETHICS OF LEADERSHIP II LAB

Neurology

  
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    NEURO 300 - NEUROLOGY

    [114 Hours]
    This is a two week coordinated clerkship of clinical training, demonstrations, conferences, and patient presentations given by the staff of the Department of Neurology. Emphasis is placed on performing and interpreting the neurological examination, and diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurologic disorders. Students see patients in child neurology clinic, faculty clinics, epilepsy clinic, and a variety of in-patient settings. Students rotate on the neurology clerkship at some point during the 12-week block that is primarily devoted to internal medicine. Neurology lectures are given along with the internal medicine lecture series over the duration of the 12-week block.
  
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    NEURO 418 - NEUROLOGY SECONDARY ACTING INTERNSHIP

    [152 Hours]
  
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    NEURO 420 - NEUROLOGY CLINICAL

    [152 Hours]
  
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    NEURO 420A - COMPREHENSIVE PAIN MANAGEMENT

    [1 Credit]
    Legacy Course: NEURO420A005 – PAIN MANAGEMENT-DENT POST GRAD
  
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    NEURO 421 - CLINICAL NEUROLOGY

    [152 Hours]
 

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